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I've got a problem (in Objective-C/iPhone dev) since more than one week, so I'd be really grateful if someone can help me out.

When I instantiate an object from a class that I've written, it returns me nil, but when I launch the debug mode I actually see in the init method that the attributes of self are correctly initialized and it seems like it doesn't execute the return self instruction.

EDIT:

Thanks for your answers Here is the init code

-(id)initWithDate:(NSString *)aDate
             type:(NSString *)aType
           amount:(NSString *)anAmount
         currency:(NSString *)aCurrency
     merchantName:(NSString *)aMerchant
           status:(NSString *)aStatus
{
    if (!(self = [super init])) return nil;
    self->date=aDate;
    self->type=aType;
    self->amount=anAmount;
    self->currency=aCurrency;
    self->merchantName=aMerchant;
    self->status=aStatus;
    return self;
}
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4  
Can we see the code? –  Mike Weller Jan 13 '10 at 13:36
2  
Please, post your init method's code. –  Kai Huppmann Jan 13 '10 at 13:36
    
Thanks for your answers Here is the init code -(id)initWithDate:(NSString *)aDate type:(NSString *)aType amount:(NSString *)anAmount currency:(NSString *)aCurrency merchantName:(NSString *)aMerchant status:(NSString *)aStatus { if (!(self = [super init])) return nil; self->date=aDate; self->type=aType; self->amount=anAmount; self->currency=aCurrency; self->merchantName=aMerchant; self->status=aStatus; return self; } –  Archanimus Jan 13 '10 at 15:36
    
Please post the code you're using to check if the returned object is nil (I'm suspecting you're wrong by saying When I instantiate an object from a class that I've written, it returns me nil or you're using alloc/init incorrectly - because the code you posted looks fine) –  Adam Woś Jan 13 '10 at 17:06

3 Answers 3

I'd put your code inside the following

    if (self = [super init]) {
        // Custom initialization
    }
    return self;

rather than the if (!(self... return nil you have used. But that's just a habit.

I would also avoid the C++ style '->' assignments and instead use self.currency=aCurrency; (or [self setCurrency:aCurrency]; which is closer to the c++ calls I guess) assuming these are declared as @property or have getters and setters.

I'm sure one of those will get you going!

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2  
self.currency only works if currency has been declared as an @property (or if he has a setCurrency method). –  Dave DeLong Jan 13 '10 at 16:18
    
Actually, using if (!(self = [super init])) return nil; gets rid of the whole-method-long if instruction which I personally despise. I use this method too :) –  Adam Woś Jan 13 '10 at 17:07
    
I thought the c++ -> was a method caller and required the same thing. My mistake. –  Andiih Jan 13 '10 at 17:09
    
Now I've thought about it, I agree Adam. –  Andiih Jan 13 '10 at 17:17
2  
Also, Wil Shipley's take on initializer form is worth reading: wilshipley.com/blog/2005/07/self-stupid-init.html –  Brad Larson Jan 13 '10 at 18:58

Don't use self->instanceVariable.

Just use instanceVariable.

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You should write

self.date = aDate;
// etc.... 

if date etc. is declared as a @property in the @interface, or if it's just a class instance variable, use

date = aDate;
// etc...

Also, if the strings are not declared as @property with retain or copy modifiers, you'll need to manually retain them thus:

date = [aDate retain];
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Thanks. But I don't think this is the actual problem, even though every attribut is a property. Actually, I just wrote it with -> to avoid the properties mechanisme to trigger, for performance reasons. May be i'm completely wrong since I'm in Objective-C only for one month... :) –  Archanimus Jan 13 '10 at 16:55
1  
"to avoid the properties mechanisme to trigger, for performance reasons" - trying to optimize something prematurely is one of the worst possible errors people do to increase performance... Using properties (with their retain/copy/assign types) lets it easier to manage memory correcly in Objective-C - I strongly suggest you use it, and optimise performance only after you've established where your real bottlenecks are. –  Adam Woś Jan 13 '10 at 17:05
    
just use date=aDate to avoid triggering the setters. However, you will start to leak if you are not very careful. –  Andiih Jan 13 '10 at 17:07
    
Thank you for the advise ! –  Archanimus Jan 14 '10 at 8:15

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