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In the following code, "d.Foo()" throws a compiler error claiming that function Foo() does not take 0 arguments. Yet a 0-argument function with that name exists in the base class. The line "d.Base::Foo()" is acceptable.

I have a vague memory of learning that the use of a function name in a derived class hides all functions of that name in a base class, even though arguments may be different. I don't remember why, nor do I remember the best way to avoid that problem. Is my solution best, or is there another way to get at Base::Foo()?

Thanks very much!

RobR

// Override.cpp : Defines the entry point for the console application.
//

#include "stdafx.h"
class Base
{
public :
    void Foo()
    {
    }
};

class Derived : public Base
{
public: 
    void Foo(int x)
    {
    }
};

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    Derived d;
    d.Foo();
    d.Base::Foo();

    return 0;
}
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marked as duplicate by timrau, Christopher Creutzig, Luc M, quamrana, Casey Dec 13 '13 at 20:48

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Many thanks. My question is indeed a duplicate of that one, and responses to that are quite good. –  ROBERT RICHARDSON Dec 13 '13 at 17:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could define Derived::Foo() as:

class Derived : public Base {
public:
    void Foo() { Base::Foo(); }
};
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you can use(!) base class member functions via using

class Derived : public Base {
public:
    using Base::Foo;
};
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