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I have the following function that sets the N highest bits, e.g. set_n_high(8) == 0xff00000000000000

uint64_t set_n_high(int n)
{
    uint64_t v = 0;
    int i;
    for (i = 63 ; i > 63 - n; i--) {
        v |= (1llu << i);
    }

    return v;
}

Now just out of curiosity, is there any way in C to accomplish the same without using a loop (or a lookup table) ?

EDIT: n = 0 and n = 64 are cases to be handled, just as the loop variant does.

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Are you OK with it if n = 0 or n = 64 don't work? That would allow some simplification. –  harold Dec 13 '13 at 18:19
    
@harold Sorry. I misinterpteted that completely. n = 64 and n = 0 must work too. n < 0 and n > 64 is of no concern though. –  user964970 Dec 13 '13 at 18:31
    
Oh. Well then I'm afraid my answer will be useless. –  harold Dec 13 '13 at 18:33
    
Pedantic thought: 2 first posted answers use 0uLL. As this is uint64_t, could use ((uint64_t)0) as unsigned long long could be wider than unint64_t and so unnecessary to go to that size. –  chux Dec 13 '13 at 18:35
    
@harold not completely, as a simple check for the edge cases can be added too. chux, just use UINT64_C(0) –  user964970 Dec 13 '13 at 18:35

6 Answers 6

If you're OK with the n = 0 case not working, you can simplify it to

uint64_t set_n_high(int n)
{
    return ~UINT64_C(0) << (64 - n);
}

If, in addition to that, you're OK with "weird shift counts" (undefined behaviour, but Works On My Machine), you can simplify that even further to

uint64_t set_n_high(int n)
{
    return ~UINT64_C(0) << -n;
}

If you're OK with the n = 64 case not working, you can simplify it to

uint64_t set_n_high(int n)
{
    return ~(~UINT64_C(0) >> n);
}

If using this means that you have to validate n, it won't be faster. Otherwise, it might be.

If you're not OK with either case not working, it gets trickier. Here's a suggestion (there may be a better way)

uint64_t set_n_high(int n)
{
    return ~(~UINT64_C(0) >> (n & 63)) | -(uint64_t)(n >> 6);
}

Note that negating an unsigned number is perfectly well-defined.

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2  
The only thing I'm not okay with is my computer blowing up. –  Fiddling Bits Dec 13 '13 at 18:35
    
I think the last one works at n=64... doesn't it –  Grady Player Dec 13 '13 at 18:49
    
@GradyPlayer not really, not the one that was the last before I edited it anyway. It would shift by 64, that's UB - in practice it's often equivalent to shifting by 0, which wouldn't work either. It might work on PPC –  harold Dec 13 '13 at 18:51
uint64_t set_n_high(int n) {
    return ((1llu << n) - 1) << (64-n);
}
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3  
Note that this isn't a drop in replacement to the original code. Beware the daemons that occur when n = 0 and n = 64 –  nos Dec 13 '13 at 18:38

Use a conditional to handle n == 0 and then it becomes trivial.

uint64_t set_n_high(int n) {
/*  optional error checking:
    if (n < 0 || n > 64) do something */
    if (n == 0) return 0;
    return -(uint64_t)1 << 64 - n;
}

There’s really no good reason to do anything more complicated than that. The cast from int to uint64_t is fully specified, as are the negation and shift (because the shift amount is guaranteed to lie in [0,63] if n is in [0,64]).

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The only reason to do something more complicated than what you have is to be cute… or obfuscated. –  Fiddling Bits Dec 13 '13 at 19:20

well taking @harold's answer and changing it a little:

 uint64_t set_n_high(int n)
{
int carry = n>>6;
return ~((~0uLL >> (n-carry)) >> carry);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Might I suggest carry = n & 1 ? –  harold Dec 13 '13 at 19:04
    
@harold the purpose of the carry was to be true if n==64... I think this is the best... but I am not sure. –  Grady Player Dec 13 '13 at 19:13
    
Oh, that's a bit different than before. Well then how about carry = n >> 6? That & is redundant, really. –  harold Dec 13 '13 at 19:17
    
@harold I don't want n-carry to ever go below zero... but I guess you are probably right. just wanted to be explicit. –  Grady Player Dec 13 '13 at 19:18

Well I'm presenting a weird-looking one.
:)

/* works for 0<=n<=64 */
uint64_t set_n_high(int n)
{
    return ~0llu << ((64 - n) / 4) << ((64 - n) * 3 / 4);
}
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No offence, but that's weird.. –  harold Dec 13 '13 at 20:12
    
@harold Well, yes that's my intent to make it weird.. XD The basic idea is to split the shift amount into two parts to avoid the problem of the undefined behavior <<64. :) –  starrify Dec 13 '13 at 20:24
    
The purpose of the questions is not to produce weird answers; it is to produce efficient answers. –  Saposhiente Dec 13 '13 at 22:00
1  
@Saposhiente Agreed. Actually, you could also remind me that "SO doesn't want weird answers but correct answers". However please ask yourself whether you have ever timed it or see what assembly your compiler generates for it or translate it into assembly directly using your brain before believing it's inefficient. I did all of them before posting the answer, and please let me know if you find any result suggesting that my answer is obviously inefficient comparing with other ones. –  starrify Dec 14 '13 at 3:38

For what it's worth, of the posts so far (that handle n of 0-64), this one produces the least amount of assembly on an x86_64 and a raspberry pi (and does 1 branch operation) (with gcc 4.8.2). It looks fairly readable too.

uint64_t set_n_high2(int n) 
{
    uint64_t v = 0;

    if (n != 0) {
        v = ~UINT64_C(0) << (64 - n);
    }

    return v;
}
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