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The following code doesn't work because var clock_socket is outside the start function. That's evident, but why is that? I thought that outer variables were "seen" inside functions if no other variable with the same name existed inside the function.

var clock_socket = document.getElementById("clock");

var start = function(){   

    var hour = new Date();
    clock_socket.innerHTML = hour.toLocaleTimeString();

}

var emp = setInterval(function(){start()},1000);
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4  
What makes you think the code doesn't work? It works, obviously. Perhaps you try to fetch the element when it's not yet in DOM, no? –  raina77ow Dec 13 '13 at 18:45
2  
Depending on where this code resides (or if it is within a DOM ready block) is important to know. If you are doing the var clock_socket = assignment before the div with id "clock" exists, then this could explain it not working. –  David Fleeman Dec 13 '13 at 18:47
    
I know it doesn't work because i've tried it. But you both may be right as I put that code in the head of the html. thanks! –  Rodolfo Dec 13 '13 at 18:52
    
The head is the correct place for it, although for many people moving it to the bottom is the easiest solution. My preference is the use of the 'DOMContentLoaded' event - something many JavaScript frameworks and libraries simplify for you. –  Katana314 Dec 13 '13 at 18:55
    
Katana314 has the right idea. JQuery for example has it's overloaded event handler for when the dom is ready. $(function(){ $("#clock_socket").html(hour.toLocalTimeString()); }); –  C Fairweather Dec 13 '13 at 19:02

2 Answers 2

what you are seeing here is not an issue with the function scope as you might think. The function can see the global variable which you defined, but not if the DOM is not fully loaded yet.

To solve your problem try to wrap your function like this (if you are using jquery)

jQuery(document).ready(function(){

    var clock_socket = document.getElementById("clock");    
    var start = function(){   
        var hour = new Date();
        clock_socket.innerHTML = hour.toLocaleTimeString();
    }
    var emp = setInterval(function(){start()},1000);

})

An alternative suggestion would be to place your script at the end of the body-tag or call an event listener when the document is ready.

Hope this helped you

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I suggest when using jQuery that it be used completely. For example: $("#clock").text(hour.toLocaleTimeString()); Both .innerHTML and getElementById are not needed. –  C Fairweather Dec 13 '13 at 21:07
    
@CFairweather , yes I guess you are right with this :) –  Christoph Ha Dec 13 '13 at 21:09
    
I will rework when back on pc to complete This post –  Christoph Ha Dec 13 '13 at 21:40

Crhistoph's answer is great, but just in case you don't use jQuery try the following when writing code in <head>

(function(){
  var load, unload;
  load = function () {
    // setup all your stuff here
  };
  unload = function () {
    // unset or cleanup
  };
  window.addEventListener('load',load,false);
  window.addEventListener('unload',unload,false);
}());

This can be improved of course, but it's guaranteed to work on window.onload event

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