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I need to store the piano duration with Ticks as so then make the music note show according to that duration (Music players would know).

I'm using an interval of 100, but for some testing I used it at 1000.

The problem is this. When I'm invoking the method (I'm taking the 1000 millisecond interval one) the timer starts.. if I DO NOT manage to get the 1000 milliseconds it shows Duration 0: but then if I do for example 2 seconds, it shows 3 seconds, if I try to press it for another second (a different key) it would show 4 seconds instead of 1.

It's like it keeps on recurring. Same happened with the 100 interval one. It went mad. sometimes 40 sometimes 23 and so on. Any idea how to fix (resetting the timer)

N.B I'm using System.Windows.Forms.Timer as library

part of a method which invokes the methods further below

for (int i = 0; i < 15; i++)
{
    WhiteKey wk = new WhiteKey(wKeys[i], wPos[i]-35,0); //create a new white Key with [i] Pitch, at that x position and at y =0 position
    wk.MouseDown += onRightClick; //holds the Duration on Right Click
    wk.MouseUp += onMouseUp;
    wk.Click += new EventHandler(KeyClick); //Go to KeyClick Method whenever a key is pressed
    this.panel1.Controls.Add(wk); //Give it control (to play and edit)
}

Methods controlling the time

private void onRightClick(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
{        
    wk = sender as WhiteKey;
    duration = 0;
    t1.Enabled = true;
    t1.Tick += timeTick;
    t1.Interval = 100; 
}

private void timeTick(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    duration++;
}

private void onMouseUp (object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
{

    t1.Enabled = false;
    String time = "Key: " + pitch + "\nDuration: " +duration ; //Test purposes to see if timer works
    MessageBox.Show(time);
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are trying to measure time, don't use Timer, use Stopwatch.

You can find C# Stopwatch Exmples at dotnetpearls.com.

In abstract this is what you would want to do is something like this:

private void onRightClick(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
{
    stopwatch.Reset();
    stopwatch.Start();
}

private void onMouseUp (object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
{
    stopwatch.Stop();
    String msg = "Duration in seconds: " + (stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds / 1000.0).ToString("0.00");
    MessageBox.Show(msg);
}

Note: you may want to change the units or the string format.


Notes on using timer:

1) System.Windows.Forms.Timer uses the message loop of your window, this means that it may get delayed because the window is busy handling other events (such as click). For a better behaviour use System.Threading.Timer.

2) If using System.Windows.Forms.Timer don't set the Tick event handler each click. The event handler will execute once for each time you add it.

That is:

private void onRightClick(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
{        
    wk = sender as WhiteKey;
    duration = 0;
    t1.Enabled = true;
    //t1.Tick += timeTick; you should add this only once not each click
    t1.Interval = 100;
}

3) If you use System.Threading.Timer you may want to make the variable duration volatile.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried the STOPWATCH, worked like a charm Thank you. I'll see also the 2nd method of The Timer. Thank you very much for your help –  DodoSerebro Dec 14 '13 at 0:45
    
Another thing. the Windows.Timers.TIMER - how does it handle TICKS since it actually doesn't have it in it's library? –  DodoSerebro Dec 14 '13 at 0:51
1  
@DodoSerebro Timer.Tick is an event. Internally Timer it stores a list of the method it has to call each "tick". When you say t1.Tick += timeTick you are saying: "I want you to call timeTick each time the event Tick fires". Now, the Tick event works by telling the OS to issue a message at a given interval (In windows it is a WM_TIMER, see SetTimer), each time the window gets this message it will run a dedicated function that is handled by the Timer object, that in turn will call all the methods in his list. –  Theraot Dec 14 '13 at 0:57
    
thanks all of you, appreciated it :) –  DodoSerebro Dec 14 '13 at 1:10
t1.Tick += timeTick;

By the way in your code sample you subscribe to the 'Tick' timer event each time on Right mouse click. So if you click 2 times the

private void timeTick(object sender, EventArgs e)

method will be called twice, and 'duration++' will be executed twice. Your event subscription code should be executed only once for the timer. P.S. If you need to measure duration, Timer is not the best way to do it.

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So in this case, If I am to use the t1.Tick += time Tick.. where should it be exactly? Outside the onRightClick method? –  DodoSerebro Dec 14 '13 at 0:46
1  
Yes. You can put it right after creating t1 instance. –  Yuri Shapovalov Dec 14 '13 at 0:51
    
Thank you, will try it just in case though Stopwatch is working perfectly :) Thanks again for your help! –  DodoSerebro Dec 14 '13 at 0:52

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