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I have a simple repository that fetches some data using EF6. I'm also using a DI framework to inject the dependencies.

namespace Domain
{
    public interface IMyRespository
    {
        List<MyObject> FetchObjects();
    }
}

namespace Data
{
    public class MyRepository : IMyRepository
    {
         private readonly MyDbContext _context;

         public MyRepository(MyDbContext context)
         {
             _context = context;
         }

         public List<MyObjects> FetchObjects()
         {
             return _context.MyObjects.ToList();
         }
     }
} 

A new requirement states that I need to log each FetchObjects() call and it's outputs. I thought this would be perfect example to apply the Decorator pattern.

namespace Domain
{
    public class MyRepositoryDecorator : IMyRepository
    {
        private readonly IMyRepository _inner;
        private readonly ILogRepository _logRepository;

        public MyRepositoryDecorator(IMyRepository inner, ILogRepository logRepository)
        {
            _inner = inner;
            _logRepository = logRepository;
        }

        public List<MyObjects> FetchObjects()
        {
            var objects = _inner.FetchObjects();
            var logObject = new LogObject(objects);
            _logRepository.Insert(logObject);
            _logRepository.Save();
            return objects;
        }
    }
}

Now I'm looking to employ the UnitOfWork pattern and I'm unsure how to implement in this case.

As I understand it some component needs to manage the UnitOfWork. So in this case a service class would make some calls and at the end call Save/Commit on the UnitOfWork class.

However if the repository interface indicates a readonly action there is no reason for the service class to wrap the call in a UnitOfWork and call Save/Commit at the end. It would look really weird too. However the decorator requires this to do it's job.

I'm probably missing some essential construct here. Any ideas on how to properly approach this scenario?

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1 Answer 1

It would be a bad idea to mix UoW with Repository using Decorator (or similar) simply because it is not unusual for UoW to span across multiple repositories.

Also it is not up to the Repository to decide whether UoW should be committed or not. Repositories should know as less as possible about UoWs, ideally (and it is the case most of the time) nothing.

In your scenario the UnitOfWork class would pretty much only handles the transaction, so it can be implemented as a simple wrapper around TransactionScope, something like:

public sealed class UnitOfWork : IDisposable {
   private readonly TransactionScope _transaction;
   public UnitOfWork() { _transaction = new TransactionScope(); }

   public void Commit { _transaction.Commit(); }
   public void Dispose { _transaction.Dispose(); }
}

Now it is up to the service to instantiate/commit UoW, not up to Repository:

//assuming in a service
public void DoSomething() {
    using(var uow = new UnitOfWork()) {
        _repositoryA.UpdateSomething();
        _repositoryB.DeleteSomething();
        _uow.Commit();
    }
}

And if your service only wants to read the data, then just do not use UnitOfWork in that operation (or use it without calling Commit so it will just be disposed).

In case if your repository needs to know about UoW, it will normally be passed as another parameter in its behavior method. Note that it is not done because Repository wants to call Commit, but sometimes (rarely) it is needed for the repository to "enlist" to UoW. These cases are rather more complex.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response. I don't think the decorator repository necessarily needs to know about the UoW. I'm just not sure a decorator can make the assumption it's always wrapped inside a UoW. The problem seems to be that if the calling service does not setup a UoW (because from its perspective it's just reading data), Commit never gets called and changes made by the decorator are lost. –  batkuip Dec 14 '13 at 3:17
    
Repository does not know about any UoW and it always does its internal commits in each method in this scenario. But if the service does not commit UoW, then the transaction across all the repositories involved will be rolled back. If the service does not use UoW and calls multiple behaviors on one or many repos, then there is a chance that some operations will be committed and some will not in case if it fails in between. But that's exactly why we need UoW as a pattern. –  Alexey Raga Dec 14 '13 at 5:38
    
Also it is always good to follow the CQS principle (formulated by B. Meyer ~20 years ago) which says that if your method returns any state, then it is a Query, and this method must not make any changes. And if your method makes changes, then it is a Command and it must not return any state (should return void practically). If you follow this simple principle then there will not be any "from its perspective it is just reading", it will be clear from the beginning: if you make commands then use UoW, if you only do queries then don't. –  Alexey Raga Dec 14 '13 at 5:41
    
Also consider if your logging should be done in the repository or not. If it is a part of a business logic then it clearly should not be there. But if it is just a "technical thing", then OK, just suppress the transaction for a logging operation internally. And it is always good to follow SRP and to dedicate logging to another "logging service" instead of doing it "in place". And that service would know how to handle stuff (suppress transaction, whatever) while writing a log. –  Alexey Raga Dec 14 '13 at 5:50
    
Ah. I understand the basic principles, it's nice to see them combined. I was hoping to be able to just decorate the repository, but CQS throws that out of the window. Makes sense really. In the million examples of logging decorators nobody showed how to log "queries", this explains it. It's not just "technical", I actually need it for a piece of business logic. So in this case I should just replace ILogRepository with a ILogService and keep the decorator? (with ILogService implementation using UoW) –  batkuip Dec 14 '13 at 7:19

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