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Somewhat similar to Global variable with imports - but with functions.

Say I have main_file.py:

global main_var1, main_var2

main_var1 = ""
main_var2 = 0

def main():
  for gkey, gval in sorted(globals().items()):
    print("  mf_glb", gkey, "is", type(gval), "and is equal to ", gval)
  for name in dir():
    myvalue = eval(name)
    print("  mf_dir", name, "is", type(myvalue), "and is equal to ", myvalue)

  setup()

  print("main_file says", main_var1, main_var2, "  setup is " + str(eval("setup")))

def setup():
  global main_var1, main_var2
  main_var1 = "Initialized"
  main_var2 = -123  

if __name__ == "__main__":
  main()

If I run main_file.py directly, it outputs (as expected):

...
('main_file says', 'Initialized', -123, '  setup is <function setup at 0xb766d17c>')

Let's say now, I want to use everything else in main_file.py (it's main() function included); but I want to overload setup() so it sets up different variables; so I try this as user_file.py:

global main_var1, main_var2

for gkey, gval in sorted(globals().items()):
  print("  uf1_glb", gkey, "is", type(gval), "and is equal to ", gval)
for name in dir():
  myvalue = eval(name)
  print("  uf1_dir", name, "is", type(myvalue), "and is equal to ", myvalue)
print()


from main_file import * 

for gkey, gval in sorted(globals().items()):
  print("  uf2_glb", gkey, "is", type(gval), "and is equal to ", gval)
for name in dir():
  myvalue = eval(name)
  print("  uf2_dir", name, "is", type(myvalue), "and is equal to ", myvalue)
print()

print("A: setup is " + str(eval("setup")))

def setup():
  global main_var1, main_var2
  main_var1 = "Overloaded"
  main_var2 = 42

print("B: setup is " + str(eval("setup")))

main() # since main is not def'd in here (user_file), this will call the one from main_file

If I run it with python user_file.py, I get something like:

('  uf2_glb', 'setup', 'is', <type 'function'>, 'and is equal to ', <function setup at 0xb7709374>)
('  uf2_dir', 'setup', 'is', <type 'function'>, 'and is equal to ', <function setup at 0xb7709374>)
...
A: setup is <function setup at 0xb7709374>
B: setup is <function setup at 0xb7709a74>
...
('  mf_glb', 'setup', 'is', <type 'function'>, 'and is equal to ', <function setup at 0xb7709374>)
...
('main_file says', 'Initialized', -123, '  setup is <function setup at 0xb7709374>')

So, basically, my overloaded setup() is at 0xb7709a74, and is only changed in user_file; while main_file still uses its old setup() at 0xb7709374, and so my expected overloaded changes are not printed.

In this answer from the question linked above has a copy from a tutorial that explains:

Indeed, a global variable in a module is merely an attribute (i.e. a member entity) of that module, similar to a class variable’s role within a class. When module B is imported by module A, B’s namespace is copied to A’s. If module B has a global variable X, then module A will create a variable of that name, whose initial value is whatever module B had for its variable of that name at the time of importing. But changes to X in one of the modules will NOT be reflected in the other.

So, is there a way to overload the function in main_file from user_file anyways? Things may be made more difficult, because setup() actually uses the global variables in main_file to work...

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You really shouldn't be doing this with global variables. I recommend finding another way to pass around state information. Define a class, perhaps. –  user2357112 Dec 14 '13 at 2:19
    
Thanks for the comment @user2357112 ! I should have mentioned that I'm aware that classes are the right thing to do in a case like this, but I was interested in how this works in principle (and also, I have a "main_file", for which the effort to port it to a class may not be worth it :)) Cheers! –  sdaau Dec 14 '13 at 2:28

1 Answer 1

Indeed, there seems to be; first note that you can get the source code of a Python function using the inspect module. Then, in principle, you can get the (new) source of the setup() function in user_file.py, and "send" it to a function in main_file.py, where it can be exec'd (eval cannot accept def) - but that must be done in a global context (here in the main_file.py), so that the global symbol that points to the old function is replaced when running the def via exec.

Or as example - to above user_file.py from OP, just add this before the main:

# ...

import inspect
setupsrc = inspect.getsource(setup)
setsetup(setupsrc)

main()

... and add a new function, setsetup() in the main_file.py:

def setsetup(instr):
  #global setup # no need, globals() below takes care of it
  cc=compile(instr,'abc','single')
  #print(cc)
  # <code object <module> at 0xb77d1218, file "abc", line 1>
  print("ss1", str(setup))
  exec(cc, globals()) # globals() here does the trick
  print("ss2", str(setup))

Then, when I run python user_file.py, I get:

...
A: setup is <function setup at 0xb774717c>
B: setup is <function setup at 0xb77476f4>
...
('ss1', '<function setup at 0xb774717c>')
('ss2', '<function setup at 0xb775a924>')
...
('  mf_glb', 'setup', 'is', <type 'function'>, 'and is equal to ', <function setup at 0xb775a924>)
...
('main_file says', 'Overloaded', 42, '  setup is <function setup at 0xb775a924>')

... which shows that the function was overloaded as intended (even if it is not the instance of setup() inside user_file.py which is running - but a source copy of it withing main_file.

PS: note that any def'd function also has a __code__ attribute, with an object of the same type as the output of compile() (related to that is In Python, how can I get the global variables that are used in a function? ) - however, I couldn't really use that here.

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