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What is the best way to use F# to parse an AST to build an interpreter? There are plenty of F# examples for trivial syntax (basic arithmatical operations) but I can't seem to find anything for languages with much larger ranges of features.

Discriminated unions look to be incrediably useful but how would you go about constructing one with large number of options? Is it better to define the types (say addition, subtraction, conditionals, control flow) elsewhere and just bring them together as predefined types in the union?

Or have I missed some far more effective means of writing interpreters? Is having an eval function for each type more effective, or perhaps using monads?

Thanks in advance

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5 Answers 5

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Discriminated unions look to be incrediably useful but how would you go about constructing one with large number of options? Is it better to define the types (say addition, subtraction, conditionals, control flow) elsewhere and just bring them together as predefined types in the union?

I am not sure what you are asking here; even with a large number of options, DUs still are simple to define. See e.g. this blog entry for a tiny language's DU structure (as well as a more general discussion about writing tree transforms). It's fine to have a DU with many more cases, and common in compilers/interpreters to use such a representation.

As for parsing, I prefer monadic parser combinators; check out FParsec or see this old blog entry. After using such parser combinators, I can never go back to anything like lex/yacc/ANTLR - external DSLs seem so primitive in comparison.

(EDIT: The 'tiny arithmetic examples' you have found are probably pretty much representative of what larger solutions looks like as well. The 'toy' examples usually show off the right architecture.)

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link to the old blog entry seems to be broken. –  Dmitry G. Dec 25 '13 at 6:53

I second Brian's suggestion to take a look at FParsec. If you're interested in doing things the old-school way with FsLex and FsYacc, one place to look for how to parse a non-trivial language is the F# source itself. See the source\fsharp\FSharp.Compiler directory in the distribution.

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You should take a copy of Robert Pickering's "Beginning F#".

The chapter 13, "Parsing Text", contains an example with FsLex and FsYacc, as suggested by Noldorin.

Other than that, in the same book, chapter 12, the author explains how to build an actual simple compiler for an arithmetic language he proposes. Very enlightening. The most important part is what you are looking for: the AST parser.

Good luck.

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3  
Nice to see people have already started reading beginning F# :). I should point out chapter 12 also covers FParsec (quanttec.com/fparsec), a monadic parser, this probably now my preferred of creating parsers in F# as it means you don't have to use external tools and code generation. Rob –  Robert Jan 13 '10 at 16:30

I haven't done an interpreter myself. Hope the following helps:)

Here's a compiler course taught at Yale using ML, which you might find useful. The lecture notes are very concise (short) and informative. You can follow the first few lecture notes and the assignments. As you know F#, you won't have problem reading ML programs.

Btw, the professor was a student of A. Appel, who is the creator of SML implementation. So from these notes, you also get the most natural way to write a compiler/interpreter in ML family language.

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You may be interesting in checking out the Lexing and Parsing section of the F# WikiBook. The F# PowerPack library contains the FsLex and FsYacc tools, which asssist greatly with this. The WikiBook guide is a good way to get started with this.

Beyond that, you will need to think about how you actually want to execute the code from the AST form, which is common the design of both compilers and interpreters. This is generally considered the easier part however, and there are lots of general resources on compilers/interpreter out there that should provide information on this.

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