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Here I took from this tutorial:

http://egghead.io/lessons/angularjs-the-dot

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
  <title>AngularJS Tutorials</title>
  <link rel="stylesheet" href="vendor/foundation/foundation.min.css">
</head>
<body>

  <div ng-app="">
    <input type="text" ng-model="data.message">
    <h1>{{data.message}}</h1>

    <div ng-controller="FirstCtrl">
      <input type="text" ng-model="data.message">
      <h1>{{data.message}}</h1>
    </div>

    <div ng-controller="SecondCtrl">
      <input type="text" ng-model="data.message">
      <h1>{{data.message}}</h1>
    </div>
  </div>

  <script type="text/javascript" src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/angularjs/1.2.3/angular.min.js"></script>
  <script type="text/javascript" src="main.js"></script>
</body>
</html>

Main.js

function FirstCtrl($scope){

}

function SecondCtrl($scope){

}

Now load the page. If I try entering data in first input field, it updates all h1 tags and other input fields. Same happends when entering data in 2nd or 3rd input field.

Now if we refresh the page and first enter data in 2nd input field then it updates only 2nd h1 tag. WHich I dont like - its different result of same code. Why it depends on users actions which he done first? This could cause lot of bugs.

share|improve this question
    
Take a look at thinkster.io/pick/axAQatdKIq/angularjs-the-dot – Whisher Dec 14 '13 at 11:49

This is because the variable data is not defined anywhere in the scope and it gets created at the top-most scope where you first edit it.

Contrast that example with this: http://plnkr.co/edit/mqtPaMsH2xVMJaW3mEkX?p=preview

Here, the controllers are:

function FirstCtrl($scope){

}

function SecondCtrl($scope){

}

function RootCtrl($scope) {
  $scope.data = {};
}

And the template is:

<div ng-controller="RootCtrl">
  <input type="text" ng-model="data.message" />
  <h1>{{data.message}}</h1>
  <div ng-controller="FirstCtrl">
    <input type="text" ng-model="data.message" />
    <h1>{{data.message}}</h1>
  </div>
  <div ng-controller="SecondCtrl">
    <input type="text" ng-model="data.message" />
    <h1>{{data.message}}</h1>
  </div>
</div>

Here, since I explicitly define the data variable on the top-most scope, it is no longer created on the scopes for FirstCtrl or SecondCtrl. However, if I omit the definition $scope.data = {} on the RootCtrl, it'll be created on the fly and on the topmost scope which needs it defined and not necessarily on the RootCtrl's scope. If you then edit data.message on the RootCtrl's scope, it'll be re-created and inherited by any scopes which do not have it.

Look at the developer guides on GitHub for a more detailed explanation about inheritance of scope. Among controllers.

share|improve this answer
    
This looks complicated. Will it really make code more readable using the angular? Some people strongly advice learning angular because you can quicly make things with it, but from all the complicated logic, it looks that its easy to make bugs. – Darius.V Dec 21 '13 at 8:00
1  
@SPeed_FANat1c Angular does invent many concepts (such as scope) and how they behave (their inheritance rules). This has been often been seen as making things complex but this is inherent complexity, not accidental complexity. However, Angular is still great for prototyping if you are aware of certain gotchas. I would not say that Angular scores the lowest on WTFs per minute, but it still is better supported and more complete than most others out there. – musically_ut Dec 21 '13 at 15:09
    
Now I feel that it is that I have to imagine that there is various inheritance even if I dont see in the code, but from what I see in html. – Darius.V Jan 2 '14 at 13:45
    
and ng-model="data.message" html attribute would be same as lets say root object having object called 'data' and 'data' object has property 'message'. – Darius.V Jan 2 '14 at 13:47
    
and one more interesting thing is that - as I understand - all those - root conrtoller, first controller, second controller - are different instances, right? I just dont see them, I just see them in html. But also interesting is that - updating once intance property - it updates another instance property (this is because javascript does it) and proabalby angular automatically updates the view. While in PHP - if there is inheritance, and there would be some root intance - it would not be updated , when child instance property is updated. – Darius.V Jan 2 '14 at 13:51

This is scope inheritance behavior. When angular encounters a ng-controller, it will create a new scope, inheriting from the current scope.

In your example, there are FirstCtrl's scope and SecondCtrl's scope, both inherit from rootScope and are isolated from each other.

If I try entering data in first input field, it updates all h1 tags and other input fields.

In this case, it will create/update data.message on the rootScope (as it's not inside a ng-controller), which is inherited by FirstCtrl's scope and SecondCtrl's scope because in your code, data.message does not exist in FirstCtrl's scope and SecondCtrl's scope.

Now if we refresh the page and first enter data in 2nd input field then it updates only 2nd h1 tag.

In this case, it will create/update data.message on the FirstCtrl's scope. rootScope and SecondCtrl's scope are not aware of this update.

share|improve this answer
    
current scope - what is the definition of this phrase? Or how could I fully understand it? Is it holded in some angular variable which I dont see? – Darius.V Jan 2 '14 at 13:57
    
@SPeed_FANat1c: scope is an angular variable ($scope in your controller), but that object is different depending on the context. – Khanh TO Jan 3 '14 at 3:11

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