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Postgres 8.4 and greater database contains common tables in public schema and company specific tables in company schema.
company schema names always start with 'company' and end with the company number.
So there may be schemas:

public
company1
company2
company3
...
companynn

An application always works with a single company.
The search_path is specified accordingly in odbc or npgsql connection string, like:

search_path='company3,public'

How to check if a given table exists in a specified companyn schema?

select isSpecific('company3','tablenotincompany3schema')

should return false, and

select isSpecific('company3','tableincompany3schema')

should return true.

In any case function should check only companyn schema passed, not other schemas.

If a given table exists in both public and passed schema, the function should return true.
It should work for Postgres 8.4 or later.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 38 down vote accepted

It depends on what you want to test exactly.

Information schema?

To find "whether the table exists" (no matter who's asking), querying the information schema (information_schema.tables) is incorrect, strictly speaking, because (per documentation):

Only those tables and views are shown that the current user has access to (by way of being the owner or having some privilege).

The query demonstrated by @kong can return FALSE, but the table can still exist. It answers the question:

How to check whether a table (or view) exists, and the current user has access to it?

SELECT EXISTS (
   SELECT 1
   FROM   information_schema.tables 
   WHERE  table_schema = 'schema_name'
   AND    table_name = 'table_name'
);

The information schema is mainly useful to stay portable across major versions and across different RDBMS. But the implementation is slow, because Postgres has to use sophisticated views to comply to the standard (information_schema.tables is a rather simple example). And some information (like OIDs) gets lost in translation from the system catalogs - which actually carry all information.

System catalogs

Your question was:

How to check whether a table exists?

SELECT EXISTS (
    SELECT 1 
    FROM   pg_catalog.pg_class c
    JOIN   pg_catalog.pg_namespace n ON n.oid = c.relnamespace
    WHERE  n.nspname = 'schema_name'
    AND    c.relname = 'table_name'
    AND    c.relkind = 'r'    -- only tables(?)
);

Use the system catalogs pg_class and pg_namespace directly, which is also considerably faster. However, per documentation on pg_class:

The catalog pg_class catalogs tables and most everything else that has columns or is otherwise similar to a table. This includes indexes (but see also pg_index), sequences, views, materialized views, composite types, and TOAST tables;

Identifiers have to be unique among all of these objects. If you want to ask:

How to check whether a name for a table or similar object in a given schema is taken?

SELECT EXISTS (
    SELECT 1 
    FROM   pg_catalog.pg_class c
    JOIN   pg_catalog.pg_namespace n ON n.oid = c.relnamespace
    WHERE  n.nspname = 'schema_name'
    AND    c.relname = 'table_name'
);

Alternative: cast to regclass

SELECT 'schema_name.table_name'::regclass

This raises an exception if the (optionally schema-qualified) table (or other object occupying that name) does not exist.

If you do not schema-qualify the table name, a cast to regclass defaults to the search_path and returns the OID for the first table found - or an exception if the table is in none of the listed schemas. Note that the system schemas pg_catalog and pg_temp* (the schema for temporary objects of the current session) are automatically part of the search_path.

You can use that and catch a possible exception in a function. Example:

A query like above avoids possible exceptions and is therefore slightly faster.

to_regclass(rel_name) in Postgres 9.4+

Much simpler now:

SELECT to_regclass('schema_name.table_name');

Same as the cast, but it returns ...

... null rather than throwing an error if the name is not found

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from shell: [[ `psql dbname -tAc "SELECT EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM information_schema.tables WHERE table_schema = 'ejabberd' AND table_name = 'users');"` = 't' ]] –  brauliobo Mar 8 at 0:46

Perhaps use information_schema:

SELECT EXISTS(
    SELECT * 
    FROM information_schema.tables 
    WHERE 
      table_schema = 'company3' AND 
      table_name = 'tableincompany3schema'
);
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