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After reading over some K&R C I saw that printf can "recognize %% for itself" I tested this and it printed out "%", I then tried "\%" which also printed "%".

So, is there any difference?

Edit for code request:

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
  printf("%%\n");
  printf("\%\n");
  return 0;
}

Output:

%                                                                               
%  

Compiled with GCC using -o

GCC version: gcc (SUSE Linux) 4.8.1 20130909 [gcc-4_8-branch revision 202388]

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marked as duplicate by mizo, Prashant Kumar, iCodez, DwB, John Ericksen Dec 16 '13 at 17:31

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
you are right, but this works only with printf (using double % sign), so use it carefully –  gaurav5430 Dec 14 '13 at 13:25
2  
Answer here –  Gabriel L. Dec 14 '13 at 13:26
    
Run the strings command on the resulting program. The output will show you that the "\%" has been translated to "%" by the compiler when it constructed the string literal from your program source. –  wildplasser Dec 14 '13 at 13:30
1  
Which gcc version, which host? –  ouah Dec 14 '13 at 13:32
    
@ouah; On my compiler I got only % with some warnings. –  haccks Dec 14 '13 at 13:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

%% is not a C escape sequence, but a printf formatter acting like an escape for its own special character.

\% is illegal because it has the syntax of a C escape sequence, but no defined meaning. Escape sequences besides the few listed as standard are compiler-specific. In all likelihood the compiler ignored the backslash, and printf did not see any backslash at runtime. If it had, it would have printed the backslash in the output, because backslash is not special to printf.

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I see, strange how the compiler just ignored it and carried on, instead of giving an error. –  CS Student Dec 14 '13 at 13:42
    
@CSStudent Best to use -Wall to enable more warnings. –  Potatoswatter Dec 14 '13 at 13:53
2  
I don't believe this specific case is covered by any -W option, it is covered by -pedantic, so if you really want it to be an error -pedantic-errors is your friend ;-) –  mr.spuratic Dec 14 '13 at 15:43

Both are not same. Second one will print % but in case of first one you will get compiler warning.

[Warning] unknown escape sequence: '\%' [enabled by default]  

The warning is self explanatory that there is no escape sequence like \% in C.

6.4.4.4 Character constants;

says

The double-quote " and question-mark ? are representable either by themselves or by the escape sequences \" and \?, respectively, but the single-quote ' and the backslash \ shall be represented, respectively, by the escape sequences \' and \\.

It is clear that % can't be represented as \%. There is no \% in C.

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Using GCC to compile, I don't get the warning you showed, the program actually compiles and runs. ( I didn't downvote btw c: ) –  CS Student Dec 14 '13 at 13:34
1  
BTW: "\%" is not illegal; unknown escaped characters are replaced by them selves. (eg "\"" ) –  wildplasser Dec 14 '13 at 13:37
    
@wildplasser I think they are invalid. See c99, 6.4.5p1 Syntax of string literals: a \% is not allowed in a string literal. –  ouah Dec 14 '13 at 13:38
1  
I stand corrected. IIRC it was valid in K&R. It must have been dropped in c89 or c99, then. (probably together with the introduction of the "longest match" rule for "\xabcdef" hex-escapes) –  wildplasser Dec 14 '13 at 14:00
1  
This warning arises in the preprocessor (integrated in gcc). Unknown \-escapes are not an error in K&R (2e, A.2.5.2), "behaviour undefined" (though strings and chars are a little vague). This generates a warning from ANSI C onwards, whether you see the warning depends on -pedantic. You can observe the behaviour of gcc by using -traditional (if it works for you) or -ansi (or -std=c89 or later) to compile. –  mr.spuratic Dec 14 '13 at 15:38

When "%%" is passsed to printf it will print % to STDOUT but, "\%" in not an valid escape sequence in C hence the program will compile but will not print any thing and will generate an warning warning: spurious trailing ‘%’ in format [-Wformat=] printf("\%");

The list of escape sequences in C can be found here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Escape_sequences_in_C

This wont print % for the second printf.

    int main()
    {
        printf("%%\n");
        printf("\%");
        printf("\n");
        return 0;
    }

Output: %

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