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See the following example:

(1) #outputs 1

But if I add the comma, it will be right according to the Python docs:)

(1,) #output (1,)

That's super odd to me. Can anyone explain this?

A related question: Is there not a way for Python to know when (1) should be a tuple (1,) instead of 1?

Thanks for future replies.

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marked as duplicate by Martijn Pieters, Maciej Gol, tiago, greg-449, Werner Henze Dec 16 '13 at 10:01

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Perhaps because Python thinks of (1) being an equation, like (1+0)? –  Marcus Møller Dec 14 '13 at 13:37
    
What should (2 + 0) be treated as in 1 / (2 + 0)?, A tuple? –  thefourtheye Dec 14 '13 at 13:37
    
think you, i have understand:) –  user2228392 Dec 14 '13 at 13:39

1 Answer 1

Actually, it's the comma that creates a tuple; the parentheses are only necessary in cases where there would be an ambiguity otherwise. After all, parentheses can be used for grouping as well:

>>> 1, 2
(1, 2)
>>> 1,
(1,)
>>> (1)
1
>>> 2 * 3, 4
(6, 4)
>>> 2 * (3, 4)
(3, 4, 3, 4)
>>> 1, + (2, 3) * 4
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: bad operand type for unary +: 'tuple'
>>> (1,) + (2, 3) * 4
(1, 2, 3, 2, 3, 2, 3, 2, 3)
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it's helpful.i have understand :) thank you –  user2228392 Dec 14 '13 at 13:41

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