Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am new to java, so while experimenting (which is, as you know, the best way to learn), I tried the following code:

public class wHilE{
   public static void main(String[] args){
      int num = 10;
      while(num<=100){
        System.out.println("while countdown = "+ num);
        num=+10;
      }
   }
}

It results is an infinite loop printing while countdown = 10, but when I change num=+10 to num+=10 I get the desired result.

Why is it so?

share|improve this question
    
num =+ 10 <=> num = +10 <=> num = 10. num += 10 <=> num = num + 10. –  ZouZou Dec 14 '13 at 14:22
add comment

3 Answers

The += is a compound assignment; the =+ is a normal assignment, followed by a plus sign, which is optional for positive numbers:

 x += 10;
 ^ ^^ ^^
 |  |  |
var |  val
compound assignment

vs.

 x = +10;
 ^ ^ ^^^
 | |  |
var| val
assignment

The first operation adds ten to x; the second operation assigns 10 to x regardless of its prior value.

share|improve this answer
add comment

num=+10 is equivalent to num=10. That's why the loop never ended.

num+=10 is equivalent to num=num+10, which gives you the desired behavior.

share|improve this answer
add comment

num += 10 means num = num + 10 It will assign num + 10 value to num.

Whereas num=+10 means num = +10 which means +10 value will be stored in num. +10 here means positive 10.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the replies –  user3102361 Dec 15 '13 at 5:52
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.