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I wrote a simple program to sort out my array. The problem is that the code works with int values only while I need my array to have double elements ... Any help?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

double values[] = { 88, 56, 100, 2, 25 };

int cmpfunc (const void * a, const void * b)
{
    return ( *(int*)a - *(int*)b );
}

int main()
{
    int n;

    printf("Before sorting the list is: \n");
    for( n = 0 ; n < 5; n++ )
    {
        printf("%.2f ", values[n]);
    }

    printf("\n\n");

    qsort(values, 5, sizeof(double), cmpfunc);

    printf("\nAfter sorting the list is: \n");
    for( n = 0 ; n < 5; n++ )
    {
        printf("%.2f ", values[n]);
    }

    printf("\n\n");

    return(0);
}

WORKING CODE:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <math.h>

double values[] = { 88, 56, 100, 2, 25 };

int compare (const void * a, const void * b)
{
    if (*(double*)a > *(double*)b) return 1;
    else if (*(double*)a < *(double*)b) return -1;
    else return 0;
}

int main()
{
    int n;

    printf("Before sorting the list is: \n");
    for( n = 0 ; n < 5; n++ )
    {
        printf("%.2f ", values[n]);
    }

    printf("\n\n");

    qsort(values, 5, sizeof(double), compare);

    printf("\nAfter sorting the list is: \n");
    for( n = 0 ; n < 5; n++ )
    {
        printf("%.2f ", values[n]);
    }

    printf("\n\n");

    return(0);
}
share|improve this question
1  
cmpfnc is castng to int*. –  Roger Rowland Dec 14 '13 at 14:30
    
If you have doubles, then why are you casting to int* in your comparison function? –  Oliver Charlesworth Dec 14 '13 at 14:30
    
You cannot just say 'oh these are ints' - they are doubles. Try using sgn: return ( sgn((double)a - (double)b) ); –  Rob Dec 14 '13 at 14:31
    
@haccks why you need argument for cmpfunc ? –  P0W Dec 14 '13 at 14:42
    
@haccks cmpfunc is a compare function used for qsort, and I've no idea what you're talking about –  P0W Dec 14 '13 at 14:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You want to sort doubles but you compare them as ints... Try this comparison function:

int cmpfunc (const void * a, const void * b)
{
  if (*(double*)a > *(double*)b)
    return 1;
  else if (*(double*)a < *(double*)b)
    return -1;
  else
    return 0;  
}
share|improve this answer

Did you miss double* conversion ?:

Also fix as one of the comment says

int cmpfunc (const void * a, const void * b)
{
  return (*(double*)a > *(double*)b) ? 1 : (*(double*)a < *(double*)b) ? -1:0 ;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
and what about doubles that are outside the range for ints (even thought they are not here)? –  Rob Dec 14 '13 at 14:32
    
@Rob yeah, good catch, thanks –  P0W Dec 14 '13 at 14:36
    
thanks, worked! –  yak Dec 14 '13 at 14:36

You comparison function is for int not for double:

int cmpfunc (const void * a, const void * b)
{
    return ( *(int*)a - *(int*)b );
}

Note that comparing floating point is different than comparing integer values. Because of floating point precision, it's not enough to change int * to double * above, you should use an epsilon constant for comparison.

http://c-faq.com/fp/fpequal.html

EDIT: I striked the above paragraph as it is not relevant for sorting, see the comments section. I don't delete my answer to keep the comments visible.

share|improve this answer
2  
no, you don't need an epsilon. why would you? –  Karoly Horvath Dec 14 '13 at 14:33
    
Fine, did it with eps, doesnt work too: pastie.org/private/3mwz7jt3q7zicly4j3gw –  yak Dec 14 '13 at 14:33
2  
Why would you need an epsilon? –  Oliver Charlesworth Dec 14 '13 at 14:34
4  
@ouah: No, absolutely not. Using a tolerance to compare floating-point numbers, whether for equality or inequality, should only be in an application-specific situation. It should not be in a library routine because there is no general criterion for what constitutes equality or inequality in the face of errors. The underlying problem is not actually about equality. It is the inability to compute any function given incorrect inputs. This problem is exacerbated by discontinuous functions or functions with large derivates, but it exists for all functions. –  Eric Postpischil Dec 14 '13 at 14:47
1  
@ouah: Sorting without a tolerance in the comparison function produces a list of numbers in order. Sorting with a tolerance generally does not. Therefore, using a tolerance is wrong. –  Eric Postpischil Dec 14 '13 at 14:56

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