Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have this code:

var items = this.llistat.getElementsByTagName('a');

for( var i = 0; i < items.length; i++ ){    
  items[i].addEventListener('click', function(event) {
    alert( i );
  }, items[i]);
}

where the event is listened, but there are 3 items and the alert allways print 3 on any of the elements (it doesn't respect the index),

Dosen't items[i] shouldn't do the job as closure?

thanks!

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by apsillers, Jonathan Lonowski, Wladimir Palant, DwB, Lekensteyn Dec 16 '13 at 17:31

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
The third argument to addEventListener is a boolean that indicates whether the event listener gets capture priority (e.g., to make it cancelable); it does not specify a this value. –  apsillers Dec 14 '13 at 20:13
    
Also related, Javascript infamous Loop problem?. –  Jonathan Lonowski Dec 14 '13 at 20:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

That's a classical closure issue : you must create a new function bound, not to the 'i' variable, but to its value at the time of binding :

var items = this.llistat.getElementsByTagName('a');

for( var i = 0; i < items.length; i++ ) {
        items[i].addEventListener('click', listener.bind( null, i) );
}

function listener(index) {
         alert(index);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your anser, this works. Is it posible using anonimous functions only? just curious.. thanks! –  Toni Michel Caubet Dec 14 '13 at 20:31
    
You're welcome. The function that is stored inside listener is anonymous. You might not want to create this intermediate var and just replace, inside addEventListener, 'listener' by its value. Yet i think it's more easily understood like this. –  GameAlchemist Dec 14 '13 at 20:37
    
Javascript interpreters do not optimise so it's more efficient to define function listener(index) { return function() {...}; } outside the loop then have the single statement items[i].addEventListener('click', listener(i)); inside the loop. The efficiency arises from defining the outer function once. As written above the outer function is defined (and executed) at every iteration of the loop. –  Beetroot-Beetroot Dec 15 '13 at 2:46
    
@Beetroot-Beetroot : i edited, but more for clarity than for performances : a click handler is anyway very slow, but yes, now only one function will be created per element instead of two, which will save a few nano-seconds :-) –  GameAlchemist Dec 15 '13 at 5:15

No, the third argument of addEventListener is the useCapture one. See MDN for more information.

But you can use:

for( var i = 0; i < items.length; i++ ){
    (function(i){
        items[i].addEventListener('click', function(event) {
            alert( i );
        }, false);
    })(i);
}

or

var handler = function(event) {
    var i = items.indexOf(this);
    alert( i );
};
for( var i = 0; i < items.length; i++ ){
    items[i].addEventListener('click', handler, false);
}

The first one creates a new event handler for each element, so it needs more memory. The second one reuses the same event listener, but uses indexOf, so it's more slow.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.