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I'm trying to read into a buffer passed as a pointer to this function. memcpy() works fine and the data is stored correctly in buffer, but when I access buffer outside of the function it is null. There's some pointer issue I'm not getting here.

Here's the code, I took out most of it, I know it copies the data correctly, but it doesn't pass it to the buffer pointer. Ideas?

int read(file file, char *buffer , int maxlen) {
    int bytes_read;

    // copy data to file buffer
    bytes_read = min(maxlen, file->file_size - file->cursor);
    buffer = (char*) malloc(bytes_read);

    memcpy(buffer , file->buffer + file->cursor, bytes_read);

    return bytes_read;
}
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1  
You need to pass in a char** buffer. –  OldProgrammer Dec 14 '13 at 22:39
    
As @OldProgrammer indicates, you're not actually passing a reference to the buffer -- you're passing a reference to a single character. –  reuben Dec 14 '13 at 22:40
    
@reuben No, he's passing a pointer. There are no references in C. –  user529758 Dec 14 '13 at 22:40
1  
@H2CO3 Yes, I understand that. "Pass by reference" is a valid and venerated term, even in C. I was using the term more loosely, in the abstract sense of reference. –  reuben Dec 14 '13 at 22:42

2 Answers 2

The problem is pretty simple: you are modifying the variable "buffer". Since it is passed by value and not by reference, the calling function doesn't see the change. In order to make the change to buffer visible, you need to pass in a pointer to buffer.

Your function would then look like this:

int read(file file, char **buffer , int maxlen) {
    int bytes_read;

    // copy data to file buffer
    bytes_read = min(maxlen, file->file_size - file->cursor);
    *buffer = (char*) malloc(bytes_read);

    memcpy(*buffer , file->buffer + file->cursor, bytes_read);

    return bytes_read;
}

to call the function:

rv = read(file, &buffer, maxlen);
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You cannot modify buffer directly because C uses pass by value with parameters. Therefore it is a copy of the pointer you are modifying. To change the pointer you need to change your function prototype to take a char** and allocate to the first level of indirection on that.

As a crude example of this:

void read(char** buffer , int byte_size) {
    *buffer = (char*) malloc(byte_size);
}

and use where required with something like

char* buffer;
read(&buffer,10); /* now buffer points to dynamically allocated array of 10 chars */
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