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I'm reading a sound from file to memory using FMOD. After loading, I convert it to float format, such that I'll be able to visualize it and process further.

I also want the FMOD to play my sound stored in memory. There's a problem though: I'm storing it in memory as float[], but FMOD.System.createSteam requires the raw data to be byte[]. I may copy the whole array using the Marshal, but I would end up with two copies of the same array. Is there a way to access the float[] array as raw bytes (byte[])?

A notice - I'm aware, that I will have to pin the array, such that GC won't move it in memory during runtime.

Also, I would like to avoid using unsafe if not necessary.

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I have edited your title. Please see, "Should questions include “tags” in their titles?", where the consensus is "no, they should not". –  John Saunders Dec 15 '13 at 0:36
    
It would probably depend on how you're storing your data –  Jwosty Dec 15 '13 at 0:44
    
"I'm storing it in memory as float[]" ? –  Spook Dec 15 '13 at 0:45
    
"A notice - I'm aware, that I will have to pin the array..." and then "Also, I would like to avoid using unsafe...". Those two goals contradict one another. There's nothing wrong with using an unsafe context if you need it. –  Ed S. Dec 15 '13 at 1:01
2  
FMOD cannot consume data that fast, even at 44 KHz it is still only 176 KB/sec. Conversion overhead is never a problem with audio. You are trying to solve a problem you don't have. –  Hans Passant Dec 15 '13 at 1:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Obviously you can copy the float[] into a byte[] using BitConverter.GetBytes on each float. I'm pretty sure that the only way you can access a float[] AS a byte[] is by using a void* to the float[] and then casting it to a byte*. I know that you weren't looking for unsafe code but that's the only way I've ever been able to do it. Being strongly typed, c# intentionally forbids that sort of stuff.

I know that you're using the FMOD .NET wrapper but maybe you could import the native dll call for the function(s) that wants the byte[]? The native calls will probably call for pointers:

namespace FMOD
{
    public partial class System
    {
        [DllImport(VERSION.dll)]
        private static extern RESULT FMOD_System_CreateSound(IntPtr system, IntPtr name_or_data, MODE mode, ref CREATESOUNDEXINFO exinfo, ref IntPtr sound);
        [DllImport(VERSION.dll)]
        private static extern RESULT FMOD_System_CreateStream(IntPtr system, IntPtr name_or_data, MODE mode, ref CREATESOUNDEXINFO exinfo, ref IntPtr sound);

        public RESULT createSound(IntPtr data, MODE mode, ref CREATESOUNDEXINFO exinfo, ref Sound sound)
        {
            RESULT result = RESULT.OK;
            IntPtr soundraw = new IntPtr();
            Sound soundnew = null;

            try
            {
                result = FMOD_System_CreateSound(systemraw, data, mode, ref exinfo, ref soundraw);
            }
            catch
            {
                result = RESULT.ERR_INVALID_PARAM;
            }
            if (result != RESULT.OK)
            {
                return result;
            }

            if (sound == null)
            {
                soundnew = new Sound();
                soundnew.setRaw(soundraw);
                sound = soundnew;
            }
            else
            {
                sound.setRaw(soundraw);
            }

            return result;
        }

        public RESULT createStream(IntPtr data, MODE mode, ref CREATESOUNDEXINFO exinfo, ref Sound sound)
        {
            RESULT result = RESULT.OK;
            IntPtr soundraw = new IntPtr();
            Sound soundnew = null;

            try
            {
                result = FMOD_System_CreateStream(systemraw, data, mode, ref exinfo, ref soundraw);
            }
            catch
            {
                result = RESULT.ERR_INVALID_PARAM;
            }
            if (result != RESULT.OK)
            {
                return result;
            }

            if (sound == null)
            {
                soundnew = new Sound();
                soundnew.setRaw(soundraw);
                sound = soundnew;
            }
            else
            {
                sound.setRaw(soundraw);
            }

            return result;
        }
    }
}

Here are a couple of utility functions that convert from bytes to floats and vice verse in case they end up being useful. There's no real reason to use these as-is if you're not passing the float[] as byte*. I'm sure you know already how to do a managed conversion. This is just to save you some time if you wind up going the unsafe route.

using System.Runtime.InteropServices

    private unsafe byte[] FloatsToBytes(float[] floats) {

        fixed (void* pFloats = floats) {
            byte* pBytes = (byte*)pFloats;
            byte[] bytes = new byte[sizeof(float) * floats.Length];
            Marshal.Copy((IntPtr)pBytes, bytes, 0, floats.Length * sizeof(byte));
            return bytes;
        }
    }

    private unsafe float[] BytesToFloats(byte[] bytes) {

        fixed (void* pBytes = bytes) {
            float* pFloats = (float*)pBytes;
            float[] floats = new float[bytes.Length / sizeof(float)];
            Marshal.Copy((IntPtr)pFloats, floats, 0, bytes.length / sizeof(float));
            return floats;
        }
    }
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I took liberty of editing your answer to provide the actual solution for my problem. Hope you don't mind. –  Spook Dec 15 '13 at 10:35
    
I don't mind at all. You did the hard part. You don't show how you got from float[] to IntPtr though. Did you use the GCHandle.Alloc(...).AddrOfPinnedObject() approach? –  drankin2112 Dec 15 '13 at 16:49
    
Yup :) Exactly. –  Spook Dec 15 '13 at 21:00

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