Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In code(pseudo) like this

def path():
    dirList = ['c:\\', 'y:\\', 'z:\\']
    home_folder = 'peter.txt'
    complete = [s + home_folder for s in dirList]
    print complete

def fileWrite():
    filename = 'c:\peter.txt'
    text = 'Hello World'
    file = open(filename, 'w')
    file.write(text)
    file.close()

I can make both work. I want all the items from the first to be iterated and run in the second. I am not entirely sure how to do that. Any help, much appreciated.

share|improve this question
2  
Make sure to escape those backslashes. –  Adam Crossland Jan 13 '10 at 17:59
4  
Have you read about the return statement yet? docs.python.org/reference/… –  S.Lott Jan 13 '10 at 18:00
2  
Use os.path.join to join paths. –  Hamish Grubijan Jan 13 '10 at 18:01
1  
Also, these are functions, not classes. Perhaps you should fix your question title. –  S.Lott Jan 13 '10 at 18:02
    
This guy is a noob. Someone please post code using yield keyword. I do not think s[he] can write it independently just yet. –  Hamish Grubijan Jan 13 '10 at 18:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
import os

def paths(filename):
    dirList = ['c:\\', 'y:\\', 'z:\\']
    complete = [os.path.join(s, filename) for s in dirList]
    return complete

def fileWrite():
    for each_file in paths('c:\\peter.txt'):
        text = 'Hello World'
        file = open(each_file, 'w')
        file.write(text)
        file.close()

Or, as Ipthnc points out below, the paths function can be shortened to:

def paths(filename):
    return [os.path.join(s, filename) for s in ('c:\\', 'y:\\', 'z:\\')]
share|improve this answer
1  
or ... dirList = ('c:\\', 'y:\\', 'z:\\') - tuple is all that is needed return (os.path.join(s, filename) for s in dirList) - a generator will do because it is used in for loop only. Sorry to be be a pain, just wanted to show cool stuff. –  Hamish Grubijan Jan 13 '10 at 18:16

If I understand question correclty - you can add additional parameter to fileWrite like fileWrite(filename) and simply iterate over 'complete' sequence.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, clearly. The complete object is a list, so if he just returns it from path(), he should be able to write for each_path in path(): –  Adam Crossland Jan 13 '10 at 18:03
    
One could call fileWrite from the first function. If the two are to communicate through a return, they better use an iterator and not a list - saves space = good practice. –  Hamish Grubijan Jan 13 '10 at 18:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.