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I'm trying to write a code for where the user inputs two legs of a triangle and the program will calculate the hypotenuse, area, and perimeter. However, all my outputs are 0. Here is the code:

package practice;

public class RightTri {

    double leg1;
    double leg2;
    double hypotenuse;
    double Area;
    double Perimeter;

    public RightTri() {
        leg1=0;
        leg2=0;
        hypotenuse=0;
    }

    public double getArea() {
        double Area= leg1*leg2*0.5;
        return Area;
    }

    public double getHypotenuse() {
        double Hypotenuse=Math.sqrt(Math.pow(leg1, 2.0)+Math.pow(leg2, 2.0));
        return Hypotenuse;
    }

    public double getPerimeter() {
        double Perimeter= leg1+leg2+hypotenuse;
        return Perimeter;
    }
}
package practice;

import javax.swing.JOptionPane;

public class RightTriTest {

    public static void main (String args[]) {
        RightTri Test=new RightTri();
        String a= JOptionPane.showInputDialog ("Leg 1?");
        Double leg1=Double.parseDouble(a);
        String b= JOptionPane.showInputDialog ("Leg 2?");
        Double leg2=Double.parseDouble(b);
        System.out.println("The hypotenuse is " +Test.getHypotenuse());
        System.out.println("The area is " +Test.getArea());
        System.out.println("The perimeter is " +Test.getPerimeter());   
    }
}
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2  
Learn about variable scopes ... –  Silviu Burcea Dec 15 '13 at 1:11
    
In my opinion this question does not deserve all the downvotes: yes, to those with more experience, it is obvious but that does not invalidate the question. General Relativity is also obvious to folk who have spent their lifetime studying it. –  Bathsheba Dec 16 '13 at 8:39
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closed as off-topic by Frédéric Hamidi, Delan Azabani, Ed Cottrell, Elliott Frisch, Gipsy Danger Dec 22 '13 at 7:54

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – Frédéric Hamidi, Delan Azabani, Ed Cottrell, Elliott Frisch, Gipsy Danger
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4 Answers

You have defined your triangle's values to be 0:

public RightTri()
{
    leg1=0;
    leg2=0;
    hypotenuse=0;
}

You never change any of them, so when you call getArea()...

public double getArea()
{
    double Area= leg1*leg2*0.5;
    return Area;
}

...you get 0 because 0 * 0 * 0.5 is zero.

You seem to have confused local variables in the main method with the ones in your triangle object. Try making a more sensible constructor instead:

public RightTri(double leg1, double leg2) {
    this.leg1 = leg1;
    this.leg2 = leg2;
}

And calling it from main, for example like this:

RightTri a = new RightTri(4, 6);
System.out.println(a.getArea());

Alternatively, since the fields are not private, you could access them directly from main:

Test.leg1 = 4.5;

But this isn't very idiomatic to Java, so I recommend using the constructor.

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You might also want to pre-compute the hypotenuse in the constructor too. –  Bathsheba Dec 16 '13 at 8:37
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public RightTri()
{
    leg1=0;
    leg2=0;
    hypotenuse=0;
}

All you values are 0 in your no-arg constructor

You should use a constructor like this

public RightTri(double leg1, double leg2)
{
   this.leg1 = leg1;
   this.leg2 = leg2;
}

Then in the main do something like this

String a= JOptionPane.showInputDialog ("Leg 1?");
Double leg1=Double.parseDouble(a);
String b= JOptionPane.showInputDialog ("Leg 2?");
Double leg2=Double.parseDouble(b);

RightTri Test = new RightTri(leg1, leg2);

System.out.println("The hypotenuse is " +Test.getHypotenuse());
System.out.println("The area is " +Test.getArea());
System.out.println("The perimeter is " +Test.getPerimeter());
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you guys! The only problem now is that the area and permimeter only uses leg1 and leg2 in the calculations, and not factor in the hypotenuse. Help? –  user3103461 Dec 15 '13 at 1:57
    
because you only calculate the hypotenuse in getHypotenuse(), not in getPerimeter(). –  David Wallace Dec 15 '13 at 2:07
    
Use double Perimeter= leg1+leg2+ getHypotenuse(); in your getPerimeter() –  peeskillet Dec 15 '13 at 2:09
    
Area doesn't need hypotenuse. leg1*leg2*0.5 is correct calculation –  peeskillet Dec 15 '13 at 2:12
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That happens because the values that you obtain for leg1 and leg2 are not being assigned in your "Test" object. I recommend you to create a couple setters in your class RightTri:

public void setLeg1(Double leg1){
    this.leg1 = leg1;
}

public void setLeg2(Double leg2){
    this.leg2 = leg2;
}

And then assign the values from RightTriTest:

 public static void main (String args[]) {
    RightTri Test=new RightTri();
    String a= JOptionPane.showInputDialog ("Leg 1?");
    Double leg1=Double.parseDouble(a);
    Test.setLeg1(leg1);
    String b= JOptionPane.showInputDialog ("Leg 2?");
    Double leg2=Double.parseDouble(b);
    Test.setLeg2(leg2);
    System.out.println("The hypotenuse is " +Test.getHypotenuse());
    System.out.println("The area is " +Test.getArea());
    System.out.println("The perimeter is " +Test.getPerimeter());   
}
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You've said it yourself: constructing a zero triangle is meaningless. Why not drop your default (i.e. no argument) constructor altogether?

Supply this instead:

public RightTri(double leg1, double leg2)
{
   this.leg1 = leg1;
   this.leg2 = leg2;
   this.hypotenuse = Math.sqrt(leg1 * leg1 + leg2 * leg2);
}

Notice that I've bought the hypotenuse calculation inside the constructor. You might even want to bring the setting of Area and Perimeter inside it too: then you can guarantee that the object is in a well-formed state on construction at the expense of virtually negligible overhead. Of course, you'll need to adjust your various get... functions.

I've also dropped the pow functions. The way you have them with 2.0 as the argument will invoke a slow computation: it's much quicker for powers of 2 to multiply the numbers yourself.

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