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I have a boolean array and I want to know how to test all of them in an if statement without it taking up to much space, here is what I have so far.

    private boolean[] running = new boolean[10]

    if(running[] == true){
      goes through code here
    }

That is what I am trying to do put it won't work I don't want to have to write them all out like so.

    private boolean[] running = new boolean[10]

    if(running[1] == true || running[2] == true || running[3] == true || etc.){
      goes through code here
    }

So if there is a way to check all of them at once that would be great.

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So do you want to test if all of the booleans are true, or if at least one of them is true ? –  nos Dec 15 '13 at 4:57
    
You gotta do a loop, one way or another. –  Hot Licks Dec 15 '13 at 5:00
    
It can be done without a loop easily enough... but it would make his/her life easier and the code prettier to use a loop. If for whatever reason he/she don't want a loop and you need to do it in that one if-statement, one way to make it "smaller" is to not assert if a boolean value == true - that's redundant. Just use if (running[0] || running[1] || ...etc). –  Tobias Roland Dec 15 '13 at 5:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
for(boolean bool : running) {
    if(bool) {
        //your code
        break;
    }
}
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public static boolean any (boolean[] array) {
    for (boolean item : array) {
        if (item) {
           return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

if (any(running)) {
    // your code
}
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Tempted to edit your function to take a value and rename it contains...anyway, if the OP is working with arrays of boolean, this is a fair starting point for the next function "all"... –  jmoreno Dec 15 '13 at 5:10
    
usually "contains" is a method of an object. I'm used to python, which has any() and all() builtin. –  user3103692 Dec 15 '13 at 5:14
    
True, but I mainly deal with .net where you'd be "adding" to the class via an extension method for something as basic as this. Like I said, tempted, but not enough to actually do it. In practice, I'd probably write it to take a parameter and then wrap it up in anyTrue and anyFalse. –  jmoreno Dec 15 '13 at 5:33

You're going to need to write a loop.

boolean success = true;
for( int i = 0; i < running.length; ++i ) {
    if( running[i] == false ) {
         success = false;
         break;
    }
}
if( success == true ) {
    // Do stuff
}

You shouldn't worry about taking up too many lines of code. Just worry about writing code that's easy to understand.

EDIT: The above runs the if statement if all of the items in the array are true. If you actually wanted to execute the code if any one item in the array is true, it would look more like this:

boolean success = false;
for( int i = 0; i < running.length; ++i ) {
    if( running[i] == true ) {
         success = true;
         break;
    }
}
if( success == true ) {
    // Do stuff
}
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2  
OP seems to want OR. –  Sotirios Delimanolis Dec 15 '13 at 4:53
    
@SotiriosDelimanolis Hm, you're right. I was thrown off by the first example which seems to imply and –  Joel Dec 15 '13 at 4:54

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