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I have tried this in Javascript and have gotten my answers, but the answer I need must be more exact. I am trying to divide 1 by every number between 2 and 1000, and simply print them.

public static void main(String [] args) {
    for (int i=2;i<=1000;i++){
        double g = (1/i);
        System.out.println(g); // print "1/1,2,3,4.....1000" 
    }
}

I haven't done Java in a while, so I forget my correct variable names.

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marked as duplicate by Jarrod Roberson May 19 at 4:00

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4 Answers 4

replace 1 by 1.0D that will result into double

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The D suffix is optional for a double. –  Ted Hopp Dec 15 '13 at 6:28
    
just to make it readable –  Jigar Joshi Dec 15 '13 at 6:28
    
I need it to be more exact than that, but at least a number is coming up now. Thanks. –  user2962770 Dec 15 '13 at 6:28
    
if you need more precise answer go for BigDecimal –  Jigar Joshi Dec 15 '13 at 6:29
    
@user2962770 or you can use BigFraction (see stackoverflow.com/questions/474535/…) –  Justin Dec 15 '13 at 8:13

try this

public static void main ( String args[] )  {

            for (int i=2;i<=1000;i++){
                double g = (1.0/i);
                System.out.println("1/"+ig); 
            }

output: 0.5 0.3333333333333333 0.25 0.2 0.16666666666666666 0.14285714285714285 0.125 . . . .

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I would do something like this (note you can have as many digits of precision as you like) utilizing BigDecimal.

public static void main(String[] args) {
  java.math.BigDecimal ONE = java.math.BigDecimal.ONE;
  // 50 digits of precision.
  java.math.MathContext mc = new java.math.MathContext(50);

  for (int i = 2; i <= 1000; i++) {
    java.math.BigDecimal divisor = new java.math.BigDecimal(i);
    java.math.BigDecimal result = ONE.divide(divisor, mc);
    result.round(mc);
    System.out.printf("%d/%d = %s\n", 1, i,
        result.toString());
  }
}
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BigDecimal was the variable I was looking for, ideone.com/7FBtUL I tried on IDEone, and it didn't work... –  user2962770 Dec 15 '13 at 6:39
    
It's java.math.BigDecimal and java.math.MathContext. –  Elliott Frisch Dec 15 '13 at 6:41
    
Oh, thanks, I copied and pasted ... not sure why it didn't pick those up. –  user2962770 Dec 15 '13 at 6:45
    
You also missed printf instead of println. ideone.com/QJZRtY –  Elliott Frisch Dec 15 '13 at 6:46

Since both 1 and i are integers, integer division is being used. Either 1 or i need to be double in the 1/i section of your code so that integer division is not used. You can do something like 1.0/i or 1/((double) i) to ensure that float division is used instead.

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@user2962770, did this answer your question? –  stiemannkj1 Jan 8 '14 at 4:53

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