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I have this class:

Public Class RankApplicator(Of TRankable As IRankable(Of TRankableProperty), TRankableProperty As {IComparable, IComparable(Of TRankableProperty)})

Public Function Rank(collection As IEnumerable(Of TRankable), Optional direction As ListSortDirection = ListSortDirection.Descending) As IEnumerable(Of TRankable)
  'Implementation
End Function

End Class

The interface:

Public Interface IRankable(Of TRankableProperty As {IComparable, IComparable(Of TRankableProperty)})

Property Rank As Integer
Property HasSharedRank As Boolean
Property RankableProperty As TRankableProperty

End Interface

The Rank Function works as expected for different implementations of the generic parameters. I thought to expose the functionality of this class through an extension method:

<Extension>
    Public Function Rank(Of TRankableProperty As {IComparable, IComparable(Of TRankableProperty)}, TRankable As IRankable(Of TRankableProperty)) _
                        (collection As IEnumerable(Of TRankable)) As IEnumerable(Of TRankable)
        Dim ranker As New RankApplicator(Of TRankable, TRankableProperty)
        Dim rankedCollection = ranker.Rank(collection)
        Return rankedCollection
    End Function

However, this fails to compile becaause 'Extension method 'Rank' has type constraints that can never be satisfied.'

What am I missing here?

EDIT: So it seems to be a problem with the VB compiler. Indeed, the code compiles when ported to C#. However, the extension method can still not be called from VB code where it can be called from C# code. It is possible to call the extension method from VB using the syntax that calls the method from the containing static class and passing the collection as a parameter.

Below the code in C# with the full implementation:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
namespace RankApplicationCSharp
{
    public interface IRankable<TRankableProperty> 
        where TRankableProperty:IComparable,IComparable<TRankableProperty>
    {
        bool HasSharedRank { get; set; }
        int Rank { get; set; }
        TRankableProperty RankableProperty { get; set; }
    }
}

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.ComponentModel;
namespace RankApplicationCSharp
{
    public class RankApplicator<TRankable,TRankableProperty>
        where TRankable:IRankable<TRankableProperty>
        where TRankableProperty: IComparable,IComparable<TRankableProperty>
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Set the Rank property of the elements of the passed collection by comparing  their RankableProperty.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="collection">The collection of items to apply the rank to.</param>
        /// <param name="direction">The direction (ascending or descending) of the ranking. Descending, i.e. largest value first, is the default.</param>
        /// <returns>A new collection of the items passed, with their Rank property set.</returns>
        /// <remarks>The rank will also be applied to the collection that is passed.
        /// When items get the same rank assigned, the next value of the  Rank will be determined as if all elements were different. </remarks>
        public IEnumerable<TRankable> ApplyRank(IEnumerable<TRankable> collection, ListSortDirection direction=ListSortDirection.Descending)
        {
             var groupedItems = from item in collection
                                group item by item.RankableProperty into rankedGroup
                               select new { RankableProperty = rankedGroup.Key, Items = rankedGroup};

             var orderedCollection = direction == ListSortDirection.Descending ?
                                groupedItems.OrderByDescending(group => group.RankableProperty) :
                                groupedItems.OrderBy(group => group.RankableProperty);

            var rankValue = 0;
            var rankedItems = new List<TRankable>();
            foreach(var group in orderedCollection)
             {
                rankValue++;
                var rankAddition = -1;
                foreach(var item in group.Items)
                 {
                    item.Rank = rankValue;
                    rankAddition++;
                    rankedItems.Add(item);
                 }
                if(rankAddition > 0 )
                {
                    foreach(var item in group.Items)
                        item.HasSharedRank = true;
                }
                rankValue += rankAddition;
            }

        return rankedItems;
        }
    }
}

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
namespace RankApplicationCSharp
{
    public static class Rank
    {
        public static IEnumerable<TRankable> ApplyRank<TRankable,TRankableProperty>(this IEnumerable<TRankable> collection)
            where TRankable: IRankable<TRankableProperty>
            where TRankableProperty: IComparable, IComparable<TRankableProperty>
        {
            var ranker=new RankApplicator<TRankable,TRankableProperty>();
            var rankedCollection=ranker.ApplyRank(collection);
            return rankedCollection;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Out of interest, why did you change the order of your type parameters? It makes the two generic declarations harder to compare. –  Jon Skeet Dec 15 '13 at 9:38
    
Also, could you post your IRankable interface? It would be easier to help you if we could reproduce the issue. –  Jon Skeet Dec 15 '13 at 9:40
    
@JonSkeet I changed the order of the arguments hoping to get rid of the error, but it makes no difference. I added the IRankable(Of T) interface. –  Dabblernl Dec 15 '13 at 10:18
    
Hmm. I've reproduced the error with the VB code, but after porting it to C# that seems okay. Odd. –  Jon Skeet Dec 15 '13 at 13:52
    
@JonSkeet The extension method does compile in C#, but can only be called from C# code. Is this a feature or a bug in VB? If a bug, should we report it? –  Dabblernl Dec 15 '13 at 21:19

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