Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to write a script which will download at most N files simultaneously via HTTP.

I've previously used AnyEvent::Worker::Pool to manage a pool of BLOCKING tasks. I've also used AnyEvent::HTTP in combination with AnyEvent->condvar to manage NON-BLOCKING downloads individually.

I thought that it should be pretty simple to combine the two approaches so that AnyEvent->condvar makes AnyEvent::HTTP::http_get look BLOCKING from the perspective of AnyEvent::Worker::Pool.

However, I'm getting some errors I don't understand, presumably due to implementation details of AnyEvent::Worker. Here's a really cut-down version of the script that demonstrates the issue:

use EV;
use AnyEvent 5;
use AnyEvent::Worker::Pool;
use AnyEvent::HTTP;
use 5.10.0;
use strict;

my $pool_size = 2;
my $num_jobs  = 7;

# Create a pool of $pool_size workers
my $workers = AnyEvent::Worker::Pool->new($pool_size, sub {
  my ($job) = @_;
  eval {
    my $cv = AnyEvent->condvar;
    print "worker starting download [$job] ...\n";
    http_get 'http://download.thinkbroadband.com/5MB.zip', sub {
      my ($data, $headers) = @_;
      if ($headers->{Status} =~ /^2/) { 
        print "download [$job] succeeded.\n"; 
      } else { 
        print "download [$job] failed.\n"; 
      }
      $cv->send; # notification of download complete/exit.
    };

    $cv->recv; # wait for download to complete/exit before returning to pool
  }; if ($@) {
    print "worker payload error: $@\n";
  }
  return 1;
});

# dispatch the full list of downloads
my ($need,$done) = ($num_jobs, 0);
for my $job (0 .. ($need - 1)) {
  print "dispatching job $job...\n";
  $workers->do($job, sub {
    print "worker [$job] payload threw exception: $@\n" if $@;
    print "worker [$job] payload completed successfully!\n" unless $@;
    EV::unloop if ++$done == $need;
  });
}

EV::loop; # wait here for all downloads to complete
print "We're done!\n"; # some useful code to follow here...

Demo output is as follows:

user@host:~$ ./test.pl
dispatching job 0...
dispatching job 1...
dispatching job 2...
dispatching job 3...
dispatching job 4...
dispatching job 5...
dispatching job 6...
worker starting download [0] ...
worker starting download [1] ...
EV: error in callback (ignoring): unexpected eof at /usr/local/share/perl/5.14.2/AnyEvent/Worker/Pool.pm, line 46
EV: error in callback (ignoring): unexpected eof at /usr/local/share/perl/5.14.2/AnyEvent/Worker/Pool.pm, line 46
EV: error in callback (ignoring): unexpected eof at /usr/local/share/perl/5.14.2/AnyEvent/Worker/Pool.pm, line 46
worker [6] payload threw exception: no worker connection
EV: error in callback (ignoring): no worker connection at /usr/local/share/perl/5.14.2/AnyEvent/Worker/Pool.pm, line 60

^C
user@host:~$
user@host:~$
user@host:~$ download [1] failed.
unable to write results: Broken pipe at /usr/local/share/perl/5.14.2/AnyEvent/Worker.pm line 139.
  ...caught at /usr/local/share/perl/5.14.2/AnyEvent/Worker.pm line 145.

Why AnyEvent::HTTP?

In my real script I'm using many more features of AnyEvent::HTTP; particularly, I'm combining the on_body callback with Term::StatusBar to show a progress bar for the end-user of the script; additionally, I'm strategically 'pausing' in the on_body callback such that I maintain a transfer rate equal to or less than a rate pre-defined by the end-user.

Please feel free to suggest an alternative with those features (or an easy way to hack them in!)

Why AnyEvent::Worker::Pool?

I was familiar with it already. Alternative suggestions welcome.

Why EV?

It's fast. Again, alternatives suggestions welcome.

share|improve this question
    
Perl scripts tend to use global variables for filehandles. This isn't threadsafe. –  David Knipe Dec 15 '13 at 10:19
    
@DavidKnipe I don't think that EV nor AnyEvent nor AnyEvent::HTTP use perl threads. Do you have some evidence that they do? –  David-SkyMesh Dec 15 '13 at 10:20
    
No, I'm not at all familiar with the libraries you're using, but the question sounded thread-related. Basically don't pay too much attention to me :-) –  David Knipe Dec 15 '13 at 10:22
    
@DavidKnipe. No problem :-) AnyEvent is an implementation agnostic event-loop abstraction. In this case I'm using EV (libev) which is an event-loop based on a single-threaded event multiplexing paradigm. –  David-SkyMesh Dec 15 '13 at 10:24
    
Are you saying that the clients take it in turns to handle bits of response from the server? In that case it's still true that they're all trying to have open filehandles at the same time. Which would be problematic. That's assuming that they use filehandles, and that the filehandles are implemented in the traditional style as global variables. And rather unhelpfully, Perl doesn't seem to complain if you try to open a filehandle that's already open. But that's Perl for you :-) –  David Knipe Dec 15 '13 at 10:45

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You shouldn't use AnyEvent::Worker::Poll for this task.
And I'll recommend you do not use loop specific features like EV::loop EV::unloop. This makes your code incompatible with other loops implementation.

Your code may be rewrited like this

use strict;
use AnyEvent;
use AnyEvent::HTTP;

my $pool_size = 2;
my $num_jobs  = 7;
my $cur_job = 0;

my $cv = AnyEvent->condvar;
$cv->begin();

for (1..($pool_size < $num_jobs ? $pool_size : $num_jobs)) {
    $cv->begin();
    make_job($cur_job++);
}

$cv->end();

sub make_job {
    my $job = shift;
    $num_jobs--;

    http_get 'http://download.thinkbroadband.com/5MB.zip', sub {
        my ($data, $headers) = @_;
        if ($headers->{Status} =~ /^2/) { 
            print "download [$job] succeeded.\n"; 
        } else { 
            print "download [$job] failed.\n"; 
        }

        if ($num_jobs > 0) {
            make_job($cur_job++);
        }
        else {
            $cv->end();
        }
    };
}

$cv->recv();
share|improve this answer
    
This is much simpler than AnyEvent::Worker. Nicely done. Do you have any idea what was going wrong with it? –  David-SkyMesh Dec 15 '13 at 21:47
    
I think you can't rely on same event loop in the child process. This is not safe –  Oleg G Dec 16 '13 at 3:30
    
Oh, thanks. I wasn't even aware AnyEvent::Worker created sub-processes. I guess that should have been obvious given the domain socket warnings in the output. :-/ –  David-SkyMesh Dec 16 '13 at 4:42
2  
As a sidenote, if ever needed, then AnyEvent::Fork (and related modules) can create processes where using AnyEvent or other event loops can be used. For this problem the above answer is of course more appropriate. –  Marc Lehmann Oct 13 '14 at 13:41

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.