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I would like to define a Matlab function like the one shown in the figure below, but repeating regularly along the t axis.

enter image description here

So far I tried two different codes:

    function Borne = borne(p)
    pxt = x;
    Borne = zeros(size(pxt));
    i0 = (pxt <= 0.1);
    i1 = (pxt > 0.1 & pxt < 0.3);
    i2 = (pxt > 0.3 & pxt < 0.5);
    i3 = (pxt > 0.5 & pxt < 0.7);
    i4 = (pxt > 0.7 & pxt < 0.9);
    i5 = (pxt > 0.9 & pxt < 1.1);
    Borne(i0) = 3;
    Borne(i1) = -1;
    Borne(i2) = 3;
    Borne(i3) = -1;
    Borne(i4) = 3;
    Borne(i5) = -1;

This one works, but I might be obliged to go to time=100 perhaps.

    function Borne = borne(p)
    x=0:0.2:100;
    y=ones(1,length(x));
    for i=1:length(x)
      if mod(i,2) == 1;
        y(i)=3;
      else
        y(i)=-1;
      end
    end
    Borne=stairs(x,y);

This one doesn't work at all, it gives me a constant function at 147 circa. Also, at the end of the for loop both x and y have length=1, and I don't know why.

Is there a better way to define my function, maybe? If not, how can I improve my codes? Thank you very much!

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can do it one-shot with the remainder (rem) function and logical indexing:

%// Data
period = 1;
up_start = .1;
up_stop = .4;
up_value = 3;
down_value = -1;
x = linspace(0,10,200); %// x axis

%// Generate function
Borne = zeros(size(x)); %// initiallize
aux = rem(x,period);
ind = (aux>=up_start) & (aux<up_stop); %// index of "up" values
Borne(ind) = up_value;
Borne(~ind) = down_value;

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
+1, Nice answer, didn't think about using rem... and I'll be the one making you a moderator Luis! Congratz! =) – Stewie Griffin Dec 15 '13 at 12:00
    
@RobertP. Hahaha, yes! Thank you! Now I have to figure out what being a moderator means, exactly... :-) – Luis Mendo Dec 15 '13 at 12:09
    
Thank you all for you answers, but I'm having some trouble using this solution: I pasted the code after the definition of the function Borne, but when I try to call it using a value t, i.e. when I write borne(t), I get the error "In an assignment A(I) = B, the number of elements in B and I must be the same." How can I solve this? – user3103071 Dec 16 '13 at 17:02

If you want steps at 2, 4, 6 etc. you could use cumsum:

t = (1:14).*0.1;
x(2:4:12) = -4;
x(4:4:14) = 4;
x(1) = 3;      
y = cumsum(x);
[t; y] = 
1    2    3    4    5    6    7    8    9   10   11   12   13   14
0    1    1    0    0    1    1    0    0    1    1    0    0    1

The way this works is, you first create a vector that is +1 and -1 where you want the step to be. cumsum will take the cumulative sum of this vector, thus altering between 1 and 0.

If you want, you can plot this using stairs.

Update

With your values, this will be:

n = 8;      % Don't know the length of t 
t = (0:n).*0.1;
x = zeros(1, length(t));
x(2:4:length(t)) = -4;
x(4:4:length(t)) = 4;
x(1) = 3;      
y = cumsum(x);
[t; y] = 
   0.00000   0.10000   0.20000   0.30000   0.40000   0.50000   0.60000   0.70000
   3.00000  -1.00000  -1.00000   3.00000   3.00000  -1.00000  -1.00000   3.00000
share|improve this answer

No complicated code is needed for something like this. You can use the square function, which is part of the Signal Processing toolbox that comes with most distributions of Matlab:

miny = -1;    % Minimum amplitude
maxy = 3;     % Maximum amplitude
period = 0.4; % Period in Hz, 1/frequency
duty = 0.5;   % Duty cycle, percentage of time spent at maxy
offset = 0.1; % Phase offset in sec.
t = 0:0.01:3;
y = 0.5*(maxy-miny)*square(2*pi*(t-offset)/period,duty*100)-miny;

figure;
plot(t,y)
axis([t(1) t(end) miny-0.1*(maxy-miny) maxy+0.1*(maxy-miny)])
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