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I want to sort the array c. But I don't get the answer a,b,c,d. Instead I get a,b,d,c. What could I do, for sorting the whole array and not only one row?

EDIT: I want to sort the numbers. And the connected letters, should have the same order like the sorted numbers. sorry my question wasn't clear. Maybe I should join number and letters first. Like this: [['a',1]['b',2]....

a = ['a','b','d','c']
b = [1,2,4,3]
c = [[],[]]
c[0]=a
c[1]=b
c[1].sort()
print(c)
share|improve this question
    
Are you trying to sort a, based on the corresponding values in b? –  unutbu Jan 13 '10 at 19:30
    
Because there seems to be some confusion what you want to achieve I suggest adding an example of the output you expect. –  Georg Schölly Jan 13 '10 at 19:36
    
are you trying to to sort the array c[0] according to the values in c[1]? –  João Portela Jan 13 '10 at 19:42
    
Yes I am trying to sort a, based on the corresponding values in b. Sorry. –  kame Jan 13 '10 at 19:43
    
you should be sorting c[0] then, not c[1] –  KingRadical Jan 13 '10 at 19:45

11 Answers 11

up vote 1 down vote accepted
>>> a = ['a','b','d','c']
>>> b = [1, 2, 4, 3]
>>> c = zip(a, b)
>>> c
[('a', 1), ('b', 2), ('d', 4), ('c', 3)]
>>> c.sort(key=lambda x: x[1])
>>> c
[('a', 1), ('b', 2), ('c', 3), ('d', 4)]
share|improve this answer

Is this what you're after?

>>> a = ['a','b','d','c']
>>> b = [1, 2, 4, 3]
>>> c = zip(b, a)
>>> c.sort()
>>> c = [(y, x) for (x, y) in c]
>>> print(c)
[('a', 1), ('b', 2), ('c', 3), ('d', 4)]
share|improve this answer

You could try (for Python 3.x):

def sort_a_based_on_b(a, b):
    c = sorted(list(zip(b, a)))
    return list(list(zip(*c))[1]) # Returns the sorted a

This returns the sorted a, based on the values in b.

a = ['a','b','d','c']
b = [1,2,4,3]

print(sort_a_based_on_b(a,b))

Prints ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd']

share|improve this answer

This appears to be what you really want to do:

>>> a = ['a', 'z', 'd', 'c']
>>> b = [1,   2,   4,   3]
>>> c = zip(a, b)
>>> c
[('a', 1), ('z', 2), ('d', 4), ('c', 3)]
>>> import operator
>>> c.sort(key=operator.itemgetter(1))
# this would be equivalent: c.sort(key=lambda x: x[1])
>>> c
[('a', 1), ('z', 2), ('c', 3), ('d', 4)]
share|improve this answer
    
but now he sorts the letters. I want to sort the numbers. –  kame Jan 13 '10 at 19:33
    
then: c = zip(b, a) –  Tomasz Zielinski Jan 13 '10 at 19:42
    
so zip(b,a) instead –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Jan 13 '10 at 19:44
    
kame: Sorry about that, fixed now; I see you've edited the question to be clear on that point, too. :) –  Roger Pate Jan 13 '10 at 19:59

you have to provide the custom comparison function for sort to use.using lambda it is pretty simple:


cmp = lambda x,y: (x[1], x[0]) < (y[1], y[0])
L.sort(cmp = cmp)

Lambda is all anonymous function, in this case it reverses the order of elements, such that second element becomes primary key, and the comparison is done using "<" operator.

share|improve this answer

Roger Pate gave a good answer, but you said "but now he sorts the letters. I want to sort the numbers."

Here is a modified version of Roger Pate's answer that sorts c by the numbers. Is this what you want?

>>> def mykey(tup):
>>>     return tup[1]
>>>
>>> a = ['a','b','d','c']
>>> b = [1, 2, 4, 3]
>>> c = zip(a, b)
>>> c
[('a', 1), ('b', 2), ('d', 4), ('c', 3)]
>>> c.sort(key=mykey)
>>> c
[('a', 1), ('b', 2), ('c', 3), ('d', 4)]

The "key" to the sort() method function is a function. The function returns the key you want to use. The mykey() function takes a tuple and returns its second value (value indexed by 1). Thus, .sort() will sort using the number part of the tuple. And the strings will still match the numbers. You could even split the list c again to recover lists a and b, and they will still match.

share|improve this answer
def sort_parallel(a, b):
    ba = zip(b, a)
    ba.sort()
    return [e[1] for e in ba]

a = ['a','b','d','c']
b = [1,2,4,3]

print sort_parallel(a, b)

prints

['a', 'b', 'c', 'd']
share|improve this answer

Let's take a look at what's going on here:

# Initialize the lists
a = ['a','b','d','c']
b = [1,2,4,3]
c = [[],[]]

# Assign the lists to positions in c
c[0]=a
c[1]=b

# Sort b, which was assigned to c[1]
c[1].sort()
print(c)

So, of course you could not expect a to get sorted. Try this instead:

# Sort a, which was assigned to c[0]
c[0].sort()

# Sort b, which was assigned to c[1]
c[1].sort()
print(c)

Or if c is of variable length:

# Sort every list in c
for l in c:
    l.sort()

Edit: in response to your comment, the letters are not connected to the numbers in any way. If you want them to be connected, you need to join them in a structure like a tuple. Try:

>>> c = [ (1, 'a'), (2, 'b'), (4, 'd'), (3, 'c') ]
>>> c.sort()
>>> print c 
[(1, 'a'), (2, 'b'), (3, 'c'), (4, 'd')]

By default, tuples will sort on their first element. Note that you could use any letters here in place of a, b, c, d, and the tuples would still sort the same (by number).

share|improve this answer
    
Now I see the problem. Maybe I should join the number and the letter at first. –  kame Jan 13 '10 at 19:36
    
when I sort the numbers, the connected letters should join too. –  kame Jan 13 '10 at 19:37

The first thing that comes to mind for me on this is to use the numpy array, rather than the builtin list datatype.

Something like:

>>> from numpy import *
>>> a = array(['a', 'b', 'd', 'c'])
>>> a.sort()
>>> print a
['a' 'b' 'c' 'd']
>>> reshape(a, (2,2))
array([['a', 'b'],
       ['c', 'd']], 
      dtype='|S1')
share|improve this answer
    
I think that's a bit of overkill for this problem. –  Adriano Varoli Piazza Jan 13 '10 at 20:07

In Python, an array (of the sort you are using) is called list. As for your problem, change c[1].sort() to c[0].sort() and your list of strings will be sorted instead of the list of ints contained in c[1].

share|improve this answer
    
but I want to sort the numbers. -- array --> list ! okay –  kame Jan 13 '10 at 19:35
    
Oh, I guess danben's answer has solved it for your now :). And I just pointed out the array vs. list thing because the term array is used in Python to describe another, less flexible but faster, container (docs.python.org/library/array.html). –  MAK Jan 13 '10 at 20:03
[sorted(x) for x in c]
share|improve this answer
    
sorry but it doesn't work. :/ –  kame Jan 13 '10 at 19:32
    
Of course it does. It just doesn't work the way you think it does. It returns a new list containing sorted lists. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jan 13 '10 at 19:34
    
okay, but i want to sort the numbers. and the connected letters. should have the same order like the numbers. sorry my question wasn't clear. –  kame Jan 13 '10 at 19:40
    
... That didn't really help... –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jan 13 '10 at 19:42
    
+1, @kame: explain what do you expect if not this? –  Antony Hatchkins Jan 13 '10 at 19:44

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