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I am trying to define a generic container whose elements can return the enclosing container. Something like:

abstract class Container[E <: Element] { // compile error
  def contains( e: E ): Boolean
  def addNewElement(): Unit
}

abstract class Element[C <: Container] { // compile error
  def enclosingContainer(): C
}

class MyContainer extends Container[MyElement] {
  private var elements = List[MyElement]()
  override def contains( elem: MyElement ) = elements.contains( elem )
  override def addNewElement() { elements ::= new MyElement(this) }
}

class MyElement( container: MyContainer ) extends Element[MyContainer] {
  override val enclosingContainer = container
}

However that snippet does not compile because I should give a type parameter to Element in the abstract class Container[E <: Element] definition and a type to Container in the abstract class Element[C <: Container] definition.

I there a way to achieve the behavior I am looking for ? Is there an appropriate declaration for Container and Element? Should I define a third-party object ?

share|improve this question
    
Rough guess since I can't open up my compiler at the minute but have you tried abstract class Element[C <: Container[Element]] or something of the like? – wheaties Jan 13 '10 at 19:43
    
Yes, but then Element needs a parameter type too... – paradigmatic Jan 13 '10 at 19:46
    
Shouldn't addNewElement() take an element to add? That is, addNewElement(e : E)? – Alexey Romanov Jan 13 '10 at 22:54
    
@Alexey Not in this example. In my real application it takes an instance of another type and wraps it in a new element object correctly initialized. – paradigmatic Jan 14 '10 at 6:50
up vote 6 down vote accepted

The other solutions already given fail to enforce that the types match: that is, given a type ContainerImpl extends Container, you should be sure that ContainerImpl.E.C should be ContainerImpl and not some other container. Here is one which does enforce this (adapted from http://programming-scala.labs.oreilly.com/ch13.html):

abstract class ContainerWithElement {
  type C <: Container
  type E <: Element

  trait Container {
    self: C =>
    def contains( e: E ): Boolean
    def addNewElement(): Unit
  }

  trait Element {
    self: E =>
    def enclosingContainer(): C
  }
}
share|improve this answer
abstract class Container[E <: Element[_]] {
  def contains( e: E ): Boolean
  def addNewElement(): Unit
}

abstract class Element[C <: Container[_]] {
  def enclosingContainer(): C
}

class MyContainer extends Container[MyElement] {
  private var elements = List[MyElement]()
  override def contains( elem: MyElement ) = elements.contains( elem )
  override def addNewElement() { elements ::= new MyElement(this) }
}

class MyElement( container: MyContainer ) extends Element[MyContainer] {
  override val enclosingContainer = container
}
share|improve this answer

Using type members instead of type parameters would avoid the issue:

abstract class Container { // compile error
  type E <: Element
  def contains( e: E ): Boolean
  def addNewElement(): Unit
}

abstract class Element { // compile error
  type C <: Container
  def enclosingContainer(): C
}

class MyContainer extends Container {
  type E = MyElement
  private var elements = List[MyElement]()
  override def contains( elem: MyElement ) = elements.contains( elem )
  override def addNewElement() { elements ::= new MyElement(this) }
}

class MyElement( container: MyContainer ) extends Element {
  type C = MyContainer
  override val enclosingContainer = container
}
share|improve this answer

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