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I've inherited a listbox control to write some properties like this:

''' <summary>
''' Indicates the BackColor to paint the unselected ListBox items when the ListBox is enabled.
''' </summary>
Public Property ItemUnselected_BackColor As Color
    Get
        Return _ItemUnselected_BackColor.Color
    End Get
    Set(value As Color)
        _ItemUnselected_BackColor = New SolidBrush(value)
    End Set
End Property

The problem is that when I change the color at design, I need to move the control or minimize/maximize VisualStudio IDE to update the changes on the control to see the new color.

Which is the propper way to do this?

UPDATE:

I think that the way to do this is adding an special flag or something else...

I've tried this, but the property becomes unaccesible at the editor:

<EditorAttribute(GetType(Color), GetType(UITypeEditor))> _
Public Property ItemUnselected_BackColor As Color
...
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I don't see why changing the DT editor would have any affect towards this problem. –  Bjørn-Roger Kringsjå Dec 15 '13 at 16:49
    
Bjørn-Roger Kringsjå Yes you are right really I didn't knew what I was trying, sorry –  ElektroStudios Dec 15 '13 at 17:07
1  
example UIEditor: codeproject.com/Articles/687430/… –  Plutonix Dec 15 '13 at 17:08
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Part of the problem is that the property is defined as a color but you are trying to work with/save a brush. The correct method would be

Public Property ItemUnselected_BackColor As Color
    Get
        Return _ItemUnselected_BackColor
    End Get
    Set(value As Color)
        _ItemUnselected_BackColor = value
        Me.Invalidate
    End Set
End Property

And Invalidate would be the correct way to update the control because, well the current display is not invalid given the new color setting. The brush, should be created in the paint or OnDrawItem procedures not in a property get/setter. Your code is not disposing of the previous one.

Those attributes are not needed and dont do what you think they do. They would define a special way (like a Dialog) to get the color.

That ListView of yours I started working on now has an AlternativeBack color. If you want to optimize you can do this:

 Set(ByVal value As Color)
       If _AltBackColor <> value Then
           _AltBackColor = value
            Me.Invalidate()    ' only invalidate/repaint if it changed
       End If
 End Set
share|improve this answer
    
ItemUnselected_BackColor is a Color to be able to modify the color at desing (with a brush can't), but _ItemUnselected_BackColor is a brush, that's the reason why I get a color but set a brush, I think that the brush constructor does not affect and is disposed correctly because i did a performance test now to ensure it, a for range loop from 0 to 999999 to set all the time the property and no extra memory is found. if invalidating the control is the proper way then I should trust it, thankyou for all the information –  ElektroStudios Dec 15 '13 at 16:58
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How about invalidate the control when the property changes?

Public Property ItemUnselected_BackColor As Color
    Get
        Return _ItemUnselected_BackColor.Color
    End Get
    Set(value As Color)
        _ItemUnselected_BackColor = New SolidBrush(value)
        Me.Invalidate(True)
    End Set
End Property

EDIT

Since it's strongly recommended only to create a brush when needed you should do it like this:

Public Property ItemUnselected_BackColor As Color
    Get
        Return Me._ItemUnselected_BackColor
    End Get
    Set(value As Color)
        If ((value = Color.Transparent) OrElse (value = Color.Empty)) Then
            Throw New ArgumentOutOfRangeException()
        End If
        If (value <> _ItemUnselected_BackColor) Then
            Me._ItemUnselected_BackColor = value
            Me.Invalidate()
        End If
    End Set
End Property

Private _ItemUnselected_BackColor As Color = Color.Black

And in your paint method:

Protected Overrides Sub OnPaint(e As PaintEventArgs)
    Using b As New SolidBrush(Me._ItemUnselected_BackColor)
        'TODO: Paint
    End Using
    MyBase.OnPaint(e)
End Sub
share|improve this answer
    
thankyou but don't worked, anyways I think that invalidating the control can't be a proper way to do it. –  ElektroStudios Dec 15 '13 at 16:36
    
I've updated the answer to make sure all children are validated. (If the ListBox is inside a UserControl) –  Bjørn-Roger Kringsjå Dec 15 '13 at 16:42
    
+1 for create a brush when needed –  Plutonix Dec 15 '13 at 17:01
    
guys, I instance a brush at the top class declarations, and that brush is "replaced" when I set the (color) property, then I use always the same brush object variable, really that is not better than instancing/disposing a new brush every time at the paint event?... –  ElektroStudios Dec 15 '13 at 17:03
1  
It's all about how you handle the brush throughout your code. If you ensure the disposal of the brush it would be okay. But i still think the field should be of same type as the reflected property. –  Bjørn-Roger Kringsjå Dec 15 '13 at 17:22
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