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Given this code (C++, Qt containers are used but I suppose the question is universal):

// a containter for Item-s
QList<Item*> items;

// argument is const to prevent changing the item by this function
void doStuff(const Item *item)
{
    // find index of the item inside the container
    // indexOf() is declared as:
    // template <typename T> int QList<T>::indexOf(const T &t, int from = 0) const
    const int itemIndex = items->indexOf(item);
}

I get a compile error (MSVC2010):

error C2664: 'QList::indexOf' : cannot convert parameter 1 from 'const Item *' to 'Item *const &'
with
[
T=Item *
]
Conversion loses qualifiers

I figurer that since indexOf() is declared with a const T & argument, the argument would become a const Item* & (reference to a pointer to an Item that's const) which is easily obtainable from a const Item* argument. Unfortunately, since const T& t and T const &t are equivalent, for some reason the compiler seems to treat the argument as Item* const &t which reads as "reference to a const pointer to an item" which is a different thing and doesn't make the Item pointed to immutable.

Am I interpreting this correctly? Why does the compiler screw things up even though the function is declared in a way that says it won't alter the argument? Is this really a case of how the const syntax equivalence can screw things up? Why does the compiler use the latter form over the former? What can I do about it if I want to store pointers in containters and maintain strict const semantics?

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1  
Try items->indexOf(*item); –  Mad Physicist Dec 15 '13 at 19:58
    
@MadPhysicist: won't work, that argument is of const Item type, which is not convertible to Item *const & either. –  neuviemeporte Dec 15 '13 at 20:00
    
Well, your QList is a list of Item*, not const Item* . Can you get away with QList<const Item*> ? remember T*, const T*, T* const, and const T* const are all very different things –  Mike Dec 15 '13 at 20:05
2  
I think this is an artefact of pointer semantics combined with generic programming. A const Item* (also written as Item const*) and a Item* const are two different types; An Item const* cannot be converted to a Item* const. It is also an artefact of generic programming, as you could compare an Item* const to an Item const*, but the interface of QList seems not to support that (C++1y will give support for that with generic comparators à la std::less<> for Standard Library containers). –  dyp Dec 15 '13 at 20:11
1  
@neuviemeporte In fact, std::find(items.constBegin(), items.constEnd(), item) should solve the problem, as it doesn't assume the type T is the same as the type of the dereferenced iterators. The Standard Library containers currently have "the same problem" with const-correctness for pointers, although they don't have as many member functions that could be problematic. –  dyp Dec 15 '13 at 20:21

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is a case where you can use const_cast to remove the const-ness without violating the guarantee of your function.

// argument is const to prevent changing the item by this function
void doStuff(const Item *item)
{
    // find index of the item inside the container
    // indexOf() is declared as:
    // template <typename T> int QList<T>::indexOf(const T &t, int from = 0) const
    const int itemIndex = items->indexOf(const_cast<Item*>(item));
}

That's because indexOf is merely finding the pointer in the container, not dereferencing the pointer and mutating what's on the other side.

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Is there no other way? I mean, const_cast seems so... overkill? Why did the compiler screw this up even though the function promises not to touch the argument? –  neuviemeporte Dec 15 '13 at 20:04
    
@neuviemeporte : There are precious few places where you have to cast away const, thankfully. But, the few that exist are unavoidable. (Another place is the free() function, although that problem shows up more when implementing const correctness in C.) –  Joe Z Dec 15 '13 at 20:09
1  
@neuviemeporte : I think this is one of the cases that C++11 was supposed to clean up with perfect forwarding. In principle, it should be possible to compare a T* to a const T* safely, but the fact that indexOf takes a reference to the contained type means you're stuck trying to send a reference to const T* in where a reference to T* is desired. My "rvalue references" understanding is very, very limited, though, so forgive my vagueness. Any perfect-forwarding experts out there care to pipe up? –  Joe Z Dec 15 '13 at 20:17
    
I don't think perfect forwarding can help with that. It's supposed to reduce the amount of copies necessary (in favour of moves), and to forward the l/rvalueness of the argument expression. (Not claiming to be an expert, though.) –  dyp Dec 15 '13 at 20:20
    
@DyP : I think with some of the C++11 features, I can't even claim to be a newbie yet. ;-) –  Joe Z Dec 15 '13 at 20:22

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