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I am implementing a menu system in my game in Visual Studio 2012 using XNA 4.0. I have the enum GameStates mainMenu, Instructions and PlayGame and the buttons all ready in my game1 class file. How do I make the game use the

I have a game running and wish to implement a main menu system. The following code is what I am going to use in my main menu. My question is how do I add my existing game to this main menu code

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using Microsoft.Xna.Framework;
using Microsoft.Xna.Framework.Audio;
using Microsoft.Xna.Framework.Content;
using Microsoft.Xna.Framework.GamerServices;
using Microsoft.Xna.Framework.Graphics;
using Microsoft.Xna.Framework.Input;
using Microsoft.Xna.Framework.Media;

namespace MainMenu
{
/// <summary>
/// This is the main type for your game
/// </summary>
public class Game1 : Microsoft.Xna.Framework.Game
{
    GraphicsDeviceManager graphics;
    SpriteBatch spriteBatch;

    enum GameState
    {
        //which states we which to have
        MainMenu, Instructions, PlayGame,
    }

    //when the game loads, it begins with main menu
    GameState CurrentGameState = GameState.MainMenu;

    //Screen Adjustments
    int screenWidth = 800, screenHeight = 600;

    cButton btnPlay;
    cButton btnInstru;

    public Game1()
    {
        graphics = new GraphicsDeviceManager(this);
        Content.RootDirectory = "Content";
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Allows the game to perform any initialization it needs to before starting to run.
    /// This is where it can query for any required services and load any non-graphic
    /// related content.  Calling base.Initialize will enumerate through any components
    /// and initialize them as well.
    /// </summary>
    protected override void Initialize()
    {
        // TODO: Add your initialization logic here

        base.Initialize();
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// LoadContent will be called once per game and is the place to load
    /// all of your content.
    /// </summary>
    protected override void LoadContent()
    {
        // Create a new SpriteBatch, which can be used to draw textures.
        spriteBatch = new SpriteBatch(GraphicsDevice);

        //Screen Properties
        graphics.PreferredBackBufferWidth = screenWidth;
        graphics.PreferredBackBufferHeight = screenHeight;
        graphics.ApplyChanges();
        IsMouseVisible = true;

        btnPlay = new cButton(Content.Load<Texture2D>("Button"), graphics.GraphicsDevice);
        btnInstru = new cButton(Content.Load<Texture2D>("Button"), graphics.GraphicsDevice);
        btnPlay.setPosition(new Vector2(350, 300));
        btnInstru.setPosition(new Vector2(350, 350));
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// UnloadContent will be called once per game and is the place to unload
    /// all content.
    /// </summary>
    protected override void UnloadContent()
    {
        // TODO: Unload any non ContentManager content here
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Allows the game to run logic such as updating the world,
    /// checking for collisions, gathering input, and playing audio.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="gameTime">Provides a snapshot of timing values.</param>
    protected override void Update(GameTime gameTime)
    {
        MouseState mouse = Mouse.GetState();

        switch (CurrentGameState)
        {
            case GameState.MainMenu:
                if (btnPlay.isClicked == true)
                {
                    CurrentGameState = GameState.PlayGame;
                }

                if (btnInstru.isClicked == true)
                {
                    CurrentGameState = GameState.Instructions;
                }

                btnPlay.Update(mouse);
                btnInstru.Update(mouse);

                break;

            case GameState.PlayGame:

                break;

            case GameState.Instructions:

                break;

        }

        base.Update(gameTime);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// This is called when the game should draw itself.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="gameTime">Provides a snapshot of timing values.</param>
    protected override void Draw(GameTime gameTime)
    {
        GraphicsDevice.Clear(Color.CornflowerBlue);

        spriteBatch.Begin();

        switch (CurrentGameState)
        {
            case GameState.MainMenu:
                spriteBatch.Draw(Content.Load<Texture2D>("MainMenu"), new Rectangle(0, 0, screenWidth, screenHeight), Color.White);
                btnPlay.Draw(spriteBatch);
                btnInstru.Draw(spriteBatch);
                break;

            case GameState.PlayGame:

                break;

            case GameState.Instructions:

                break;

        }

        spriteBatch.End();


        base.Draw(gameTime);
    }
}

}

share|improve this question

Usually you would add it to your GameState.PlayGame, as if it wasn't obvious enough. That's where you're going to be drawing your sprite, game objects, enemies, etc.

Besides, if you're going to do a menu system, you'd probably want to use classes.

share|improve this answer

I avoid putting down any code, I just put in some pointers as to what you could follow. If you do it yourself ( its great practice ) it will allow you to think and add different functionality you might not have done if you had just taken my code directly. Or you could go the easier way and inherit from gamecomponent object, but it lacks flexibility imo.

on to your game, here is what bugs me : You will use a HUGE switch case. by the time your game is well in developpement, eventually it will turn unmanageable. To avoid having such a case, stop doing it right now, and instead create a GameState Manager for yourself. What you want is to seperate each element of your game. Your main loop should always call managers. and let the logic as to what should be drawn in these managers. Lets call this one GameWindows.

Each manager have a property which is a list of custom class they handle to logic for (a WindowsList). You give those "Windows" an ID, or a unique name ( in your case a GameState ).

In the update code of the manager, you iterate threw WindowsList, and update all the class which have a flag "WindowIsActive" at true. In the draw code, you draw all window who have a "visible" flag at true.

In GameWindows, you create a function Erase(windowsName) ( you cannot just delete a windows from the list or it'll crash in the iteration, you create a 2nd list "WindowsToDelete" and Add the windows you want to delete in there, and you handle the removal in the update phase )

Now, your main game1 class will be ALOT cleaner. You just have GameWindows.Update() in the update method, and GameWindows.Draw() in the draw method.

Basicly this lets you create different element and functionality (like a menu who can be invisible and called upon a key press ) without having to deal with increasingly huge switch case each time you add a different game element. And it will update/draw only the windows you are needing, allowing you to "sleep" elements you dont need and will allow you to keep the game running fast.

Treat all custom class "Windows" as a seperate element, you can handle their specific Draw() function for each of them. I also have a TestClick(mousePosition) function in each "Window" which you can use in the GameWindows.Update() to let you handle different mouseclick.

share|improve this answer

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