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The hash that I tested contains around 70000 colleges and each college contains around 20 students. I tried it 5 times and following are the results. There is considerable difference in foreach performance and while (each) performance. Why is that so?

Code with while loop:

while ( my ($college_code, $college_info_hr) = each (%{$college_data_hr}) ) {
    while ( my ($student_num, $student_info_hr) = each (%{$college_info_hr->{'students'}}) ) {
        if($student_num < 104000) { ## Delete the info of students before 2004.
            delete $college_info_hr->{'students'}{$student_num};
        }
    }
}

Code with foreach loop:

foreach my $college_code (keys %{$college_data_hr}) {
    foreach my $student_num (keys %{$college_data_hr->{$college_code}{'students'}}) {
        if($student_num < 104000) { ## Delete the info of students before 2004.
            delete $college_data_hr->{$college_code}{'students'}{$student_num};
        }
    }
}

When the the number of colleges are 70,000 then the execution times are:

For the code with while loop (Interval time is in seconds):

Interval time: 2.186621

Interval time: 2.058644

Interval time: 2.055645

Interval time: 2.101637

Interval time: 2.124632

For the code with foreach loop: (Interval time is in seconds)

Interval time: 1.341768

Interval time: 1.436751

Interval time: 1.346529

Interval time: 1.302775

Interval time: 1.356765

When the the number of colleges are 248,000 then the execution times are:

(execution times for while loop)

Interval time: 9.084427

Interval time: 8.438684

Interval time: 9.329338

Interval time: 9.169687

(execution times for foreach loop)

Interval time: 5.502048

Interval time: 6.386692

Interval time: 5.596032

Interval time: 5.620144

share|improve this question
    
each keys ... ? –  mob Dec 16 '13 at 7:08
    
More important than the execution time is how it changes wrt the input size. Time the same code with double and triple input sizes and look at the growth. –  perreal Dec 16 '13 at 7:08
    
@mob, sorry. That was a mistake. Edited it. –  vinod Dec 16 '13 at 7:24
2  
Well, for one, the while/each code is generating way more temporary values than the foreach code. I don't see where $student_info_hr is used at all, but the while/each code still populates it. Something like Devel::NYTProf might help you break down where all the time's going line-by-line. –  Joe Z Dec 16 '13 at 7:33
1  
Also, I don't know what effect delete might have on the iterator generated by each. In the foreach loop, keys runs once up-front to generate the list of keys. –  Joe Z Dec 16 '13 at 7:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem is Perl can't make some optimization which is common in many compiled programming languages. As ikegami pointed out, each while cycle you copy data out from hash and you also do many unnecessary hash look-ups. There is some benchmark code you can play around.

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use 5.10.0;
use strict;
use warnings;
use Benchmark qw(:hireswallclock :all);
use Clone qw(clone);

my $data = {
    map +( $_ => { students => { map +( $_ => undef ), 103991 .. 104010 } } ),
    1 .. 70000
};
my $college_data_hr;

sub sum_time {
    my $t = shift;
    $t = timesum( $t, $_ ) for @_;
    return $t;
}

sub my_cmp_these {
    my %bench = @_;
    my %times;
    for ( 1 .. 10 ) {
        push @{ $times{$_} }, do {
            $college_data_hr = clone($data);
            timeit( 1, $bench{$_} );
            }
            for keys %bench;
    }
    $_ = sum_time(@$_) for values %times;
    cmpthese( \%times );
}

my_cmp_these(
    orig_while => sub {
        while ( my ( $college_code, $college_info_hr )
            = each( %{$college_data_hr} ) )
        {
            while ( my ( $student_num, $student_info_hr )
                = each( %{ $college_info_hr->{'students'} } ) )
            {
                if ( $student_num < 104000 )
                {    ## Delete the info of students before 2004.
                    delete $college_info_hr->{'students'}{$student_num};
                }
            }
        }
    },
    new_while => sub {
        while ( my ( undef, $college_info_hr ) = each( %{$college_data_hr} ) )
        {
            my $s = $college_info_hr->{'students'};
            while ( my ( $student_num, undef ) = each(%$s) ) {
                if ( $student_num < 104000 )
                {    ## Delete the info of students before 2004.
                    delete $s->{$student_num};
                }
            }
        }
    },
    orig_foreach => sub {
        foreach my $college_code ( keys %$college_data_hr ) {
            foreach my $student_num (
                keys %{ $college_data_hr->{$college_code}{'students'} } )
            {
                if ( $student_num < 104000 )
                {    ## Delete the info of students before 2004.
                    delete $college_data_hr->{$college_code}{'students'}
                        {$student_num};
                }
            }
        }
    },
    new_foreach => sub {
        foreach my $college_info ( values %$college_data_hr ) {
            my $students = $college_info->{'students'};
            delete @$students{ grep $_ < 104000, keys %$students };
        }
    },
    ikegami_foreach => sub {
        for my $college_code ( keys %$college_data_hr ) {
            my $students = $college_data_hr->{$college_code}{students};
            delete @$students{ grep $_ < 104000, keys %$students };
        }
    },
);

Results on mine notebook:

                s/iter orig_while new_while orig_foreach ikegami_foreach new_foreach
orig_while        1.56         --      -25%         -31%            -35%        -40%
new_while         1.17        33%        --          -8%            -14%        -21%
orig_foreach      1.08        44%        8%           --             -6%        -14%
ikegami_foreach   1.01        54%       16%           7%              --         -8%
new_foreach      0.927        68%       26%          16%              9%          --

Result for 248,000

                s/iter orig_while new_while orig_foreach ikegami_foreach new_foreach
orig_while        6.19         --      -27%         -30%            -33%        -38%
new_while         4.54        36%        --          -5%             -8%        -16%
orig_foreach      4.31        44%        5%           --             -4%        -11%
ikegami_foreach   4.16        49%        9%           4%              --         -8%
new_foreach       3.83        62%       19%          13%              9%          --
share|improve this answer

The foreach version only dereferences the $college_data_hr->{$college_code}{'students'} hashref once per college, so is faster than the while version which needs to do it once per student.

The foreach version will likely use more memory though, as it needs to build temporary lists containing the keys for each hash.

Data::Alias might help you speed up the while solution. I've not benchmarked this, but it should be fairly fast...

use Data::Alias;

while ( my ($college_code, $college_info_hr) = each %$college_data_hr ) {
    alias ( my %students = %{$college_info_hr->{'students'}} );
    while ( my ($student_num, $student_info_hr) = each %students ) {
        if ($student_num < 104000) { ## Delete the info of students before 2004.
            delete $students{$student_num};
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
BTW inner loop can be rewritten as delete @students{grep $_ < 104000, keys %students} So all this code can be as simple for my $ci (values %$college_data_hr){ my $s = $ci->{students}; delete @$s{grep $_<104000, keys %$s}; } –  Hynek -Pichi- Vychodil Dec 16 '13 at 9:47

Each pass through the while loops requires a number of operations (All but the enter and leave apply to your code.)

>perl -MO=Concise,-exec -e"my ($college_code, $college_info_hr) = each (%{$college_data_hr})"
1  <0> enter
2  <;> nextstate(main 2 -e:1) v:{
3  <0> pushmark s
4  <#> gv[*college_data_hr] s
5  <1> rv2sv sKM/DREFHV,1
6  <1> rv2hv[t4] lKRM/1
7  <1> each lK/1
8  <0> pushmark sRM*/128
9  <0> padsv[$college_code:2,3] lRM*/LVINTRO
a  <0> padsv[$college_info_hr:2,3] lRM*/LVINTRO
b  <2> aassign[t5] vKS
c  <@> leave[1 ref] vKP/REFC
-e syntax OK

Included in there is the copying of the values into $college_code, $college_info_hr. On the plus side, they're not strings.

Your foreach loop does NONE of that. The only thing that happens every pass is to change what $college_code is aliased to. Very quick. The downside, of course, is that it will use more memory.


An alternative:

for my $college_code (keys %$college_data_hr) {
    my $students = $college_data_hr->{$college_code}{students};
    delete @$students{ grep $_ < 104000, keys %$students };
}
share|improve this answer
    
@Hynek -Pichi- Vychodil, Hadn't noticed you mentioned the delete slice too! –  ikegami Dec 16 '13 at 13:06

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