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try
{
    try
    {
        function(a, b);
    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
        e.printStackTrace();
        throw e;
    }
}
catch (Exception e)
{
    System.out.println("---------------------------------");
}

I do this nested try-catch block for a reason, which is simply that when I try this

try
{
    function(a, b);
}
catch (Exception e)
{
    e.printStackTrace();
    System.out.println("---------------------------------");
}

The line I print comes in the middle of the stack-trace most the time..

My question is why does that happen most the time ? and is there a cleaner way to avoid that issue ?

share|improve this question

closed as unclear what you're asking by SpringLearner, Thomas Jungblut, karthik, iiSeymour, Maerlyn Dec 16 '13 at 9:16

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
what is the issue? :O. Your first part shows redundancy. –  Kick Buttowski Dec 16 '13 at 7:23
2  
The line I print comes in the middle of the stack-trace most the time. which is the line I –  SpringLearner Dec 16 '13 at 7:27
    
This code runs on a Java Enterprise Environment using EJB framework, the second code prints the line inside the trace-stack most the time, like that e.printStackTrace() and System.out.. are not executed sequentially –  Khaled A Khunaifer Dec 16 '13 at 7:27
1  
e.printStackTrace(); outputs to the standard error and the System.out.println to the standar output. Try to change to System.err.println("------"); –  Hernan Velasquez Dec 16 '13 at 7:29
    
closed as unclear SO is full of jokes –  Khaled A Khunaifer Mar 30 at 4:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The problem is that the stack trace is written to the standard error stream, whereas your line is written to the standard output stream. Replace it by

e.printStackTrace();
System.err.println("---------------------------------");

or to

e.printStackTrace(System.out);
System.out.println("---------------------------------");

In an enterprise application even more than in a client application, you should not print to the standard streams anyway. Use a real logging framework like slf4j, which will allow you to choose levels of logging, destinations, etc.

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As Throwable.printStackTrace() and System.out.println(Object) write to different consoles (stderr and stdout), they might not be synchronized.

1st proposal: write the error to the stdout:

e.printStackTrace(System.out);

or 2nd proposal: explicitly flush the stderr buffer (and use it like in your second variant):

e.printStackTrace();
System.err.flush();
System.out.println(...);
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It looks like the "--------" comes inbetween the printed stack trace because the exception is printed on System.err while the "------" is printed on the System.out, but both print to the console.

So this can happen:

  1. e.printStackTrace() prints everything to System.err, but not all is immediatly flushed to the console.
  2. System.out.println("--------------") prints the "----" to System.out and immediatly flushes it.
  3. the rest of the System.err is now flushed

Flush the error stream before using System.out if you want System.err and System.out to appear in sequence in the console.

e.printStackTrace();
System.err.flush();
System.out.println("---------------------------------");

or use the error stream for both

e.printStackTrace();
System.err.println("---------------------------------");
share|improve this answer

This happened, because your IDE print out System.err and System.out in one console concurrently. I don't know why you need this strange and creepy behavior, but if you print out line in Sustem.err.println(); then it will work.

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