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When I try to iterate this Dictionary, it only prints out twice the customer with "2222" as the key. I have no idea why this is happening. In the past I tried to use different variables for the customer c1 and c2 (instead of just c) but that defeated the purpose of using a for loop to print the dictionary.

Dict = {}
c = Customer.Customer("1111","Jake","Main St","Happy Valley","CA","96687","8976098765")
Dict[c.getCNumber()] = c
print(Dict[c.getCNumber()].getCNumber())
c = Customer.Customer("2222","Paul","3342 CherrySt","Seatle","WA","98673","9646745678")
Dict[c.getCNumber()] = c
print(Dict[c.getCNumber()].getCNumber())

for key in Dict.keys():
  print("***Customer***")
  print("Customer Number: " + c.getCNumber)

This prints:

***Customer***
Customer Number: 2222
***Customer***
Customer Number: 2222

How do I get it to iterate and have customer 1111 first, then customer 2222 second?

share|improve this question
    
dicts are not ordered. You must first copy the elements into a list, sort the list and output the result. Besides, in your output there is no 1111. –  Bakuriu Dec 16 '13 at 7:58
    
Your code is a bit jumbled up; you may want to verify that it is what you intended to write. Also, show Customer.Customer. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Dec 16 '13 at 8:00
    
The issue isn't the order, it is iterating through the dict and being able to print each customer's information –  user3106444 Dec 16 '13 at 8:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

That's exactly what you told your loop to do: traverse a keyset, and for every key in dictionary print a number of c variable. Change your loop like so:

for key in Dict.keys():
   print("***Customer***")
   print("Customer Number: " + Dict[key].getCNumber())

I believe that getCNumber is method, not a variable, so you need to call it - add a couple of braces after the method name, as I've shown above.
Also, it's generally a better idea to stick to python naming conventions and start the names of your variables from the lower-case letters - so you should rename the Dict variable to something like dict.
If you need to traverse the keys of your dictionary in the sorted order, you can write the for loop like so:

for key in sorted(dict.keys()):
share|improve this answer
    
It won't be ordered as he asked, he need to use OrderedDict –  Kobi K Dec 16 '13 at 8:01
    
@KobiK read the last comment of OP in his question. –  aga Dec 16 '13 at 8:02
    
That's exactly why i wrote the comment, 1111 first, then customer 2222 second but i see at your edit that you added sorted() so +1 for that :) –  Kobi K Dec 16 '13 at 8:13
    
Thank you! I just started learning Python a few days ago. This was my first post. This helped out a ton! –  user3106444 Dec 16 '13 at 8:13
for key in Map.keys():

You were calling your dict Dict before. If what you've posted is what you actually ran, then this is iterating over an entirely unrelated dict.

  print("Customer Number: " + c.getCNumber)

You refer to c here, rather than anything related to key. c is still the last customer you created. If Map contains two keys, this will print c's information twice. (Actually, since the function call parentheses are missing, it might print something along the lines of <bound method object at...>.)

share|improve this answer

.keys isn't required.

Python 2

In [127]: d = {'a': 1, 'b': 2}

In [128]: for key in d:
.....:     print(key)
.....:
a
b

Python 3

In [34]: d = {'a': 1, 'b': 2}

In [35]: for key in d:
....:     print(key)
....:
a
b

Looping over dict gives key.

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