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In MySQL 5.0 why does the following error occur when trying to create a view with a subquery in the FROM clause?

ERROR 1349 (HY000): View's SELECT contains a subquery in the FROM clause

If this is a limitation of the MySQL engine, then why haven't they implemented this feature yet?

Also, what are some good workarounds for this limitation?

Are there any workarounds that work for any subquery in the FROM clause or are there some queries that can not be expressed without using a subquery in the FROM clause?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Couldn't the query in your comment just be written as:

SELECT u1.name as UserName from Message m1, User u1 
  WHERE u1.uid = m1.UserFromID GROUP BY u1.name HAVING count(m1.UserFromId)>3

That should also help with the known speed issues with subqueries in MySQL

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Thanks, I didn't realize you could do the GROUP BY without having the aggregate function in the SELECT. So one of the reasons they don't allow subqueries in the FROM clause in MySQL is because of speed issues? –  Daniel Oct 15 '08 at 20:01
    
It's not necessarily because of speed in this specific case. As it is right now, the optimizer does not work well on sub queries at all. Stay away from them if at all possible. This is being fixed in 6.0 and a lot of progress has been made on it, but that's in 6.0 and you're using 5.0. –  Grant Limberg Oct 15 '08 at 20:43
1  
Please do not use implicit syntax. It is a SQL antipattern and was repolaced by a better syntax 20years ago. –  HLGEM Feb 17 '12 at 18:01
    
HLGEM, could you please show us an example of the better syntax? I assume you are saying we should use subqueries, but since MySQL doesn't allow them in a view I'm curious what the best practice is in this case. –  Code Commander Feb 28 '12 at 18:26
1  
@CodeCommander, HLGEM means you should use the ANSI join syntax: ... FROM Message m1 JOIN User u1 ON u1.uid = m1.UserFromID ... –  qu1j0t3 May 24 '13 at 20:01

It appears to be a known issue.

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/unnamed-views.html

http://bugs.mysql.com/bug.php?id=16757

Many IN queries can be re-written as (left outer) joins and an IS (NOT) NULL of some sort. for example

SELECT * FROM FOO WHERE ID IN (SELECT ID FROM FOO2)

can be re-written as

SELECT FOO.* FROM FOO JOIN FOO2 ON FOO.ID=FOO2.ID

or

SELECT * FROM FOO WHERE ID NOT IN (SELECT ID FROM FOO2)

can be

SELECT FOO.* FROM FOO 
LEFT OUTER JOIN FOO2 
ON FOO.ID=FOO2.ID WHERE FOO.ID IS NULL
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But how would you rewrite a query in the FROM clause? For instance, how could I rewrite this query?: SELECT temp.UserName FROM ( SELECT u1.name as UserName, COUNT(m1.UserFromId) as SentCount FROM Message m1, User u1 WHERE u1.uid = m1.UserFromId Group BY u1.name HAVING SentCount > 3 ) as temp –  Daniel Oct 15 '08 at 19:48
    
I don't think you can, but you can create a second view and select from that instead of using the sub-select, as far as I know. If you don't mind a stored proc, you can also use temp tables (assuming recent enough version of MySQL). –  Nikki9696 Oct 15 '08 at 21:18
    
Or, as I noticed, Grant's solution may work for you. –  Nikki9696 Oct 15 '08 at 21:20

I had the same problem. I wanted to create a view to show information of the most recent year, from a table with records from 2009 to 2011. Here's the original query:

SELECT a.* 
FROM a 
JOIN ( 
  SELECT a.alias, MAX(a.year) as max_year 
  FROM a 
  GROUP BY a.alias
) b 
ON a.alias=b.alias and a.year=b.max_year

Outline of solution:

  1. create a view for each subquery
  2. replace subqueries with those views

Here's the solution query:

CREATE VIEW v_max_year AS 
  SELECT alias, MAX(year) as max_year 
  FROM a 
  GROUP BY a.alias;

CREATE VIEW v_latest_info AS 
  SELECT a.* 
  FROM a 
  JOIN v_max_year b 
  ON a.alias=b.alias and a.year=b.max_year;

It works fine on mysql 5.0.45, without much of a speed penalty (compared to executing the original sub-query select without any views).

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Excellent! It's odd that this works, but it does. –  Garland Pope Jan 10 '11 at 7:42

create a view for each subquery is the way to go. Got it working like a charm.

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You can work around this by creating a separate VIEW for any subquery you want to use and then join to that in the VIEW you're creating. Here's an example: http://blog.gruffdavies.com/2015/01/25/a-neat-mysql-hack-to-create-a-view-with-subquery-in-the-from-clause/

This is quite handy as you'll very likely want to reuse it anyway and helps you keep your SQL DRY.

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