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This is a follow-up question to a prior question of mine. I've come to learn that when using the HTTP username/password parameters in a request, there are 2 different Get requests expected to be sent to the server. The first attempt does not include username/password credentials, but if authentication fails, it then sends another identical request which does include these credentials.

While using Indy's TIdHTTP however, it only sends one request, which fails with Unauthorized. It takes a second identical consecutive request to actually be able to get a response as needed.

I'm wondering, is this by design, or is it a flaw in Indy?

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2  
Don't you just need to handle the OnAuthorization event ? –  TLama Dec 16 '13 at 10:18
    
Look at IdHttpInstance.Request.UserName & Password properties –  ComputerSaysNo Dec 16 '13 at 10:44
    
@ComputerSaysNo Way ahead of ya :-) –  Jerry Dodge Dec 18 '13 at 5:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to make sure that you:

  1. have the hoInProcessAuth flag enabled in the TIdHTTP.HTTPOptions property.

  2. have either:

    a. an OnAuthorization event handler assigned that sets the Authentication.UserName and Authentication.Password parameters, and the Handled parameter to True.

    b. a non-blank string assigned to the TIdHTTP.Request.Password property.

  3. any necessary IdAuthentication... unit(s) (such as IdAuthenticationNTLM or IdAuthenticationSSPI), or the IdAllAuthentications unit, specified in your uses clause.

If those conditions are not met, TIdHTTP will not attempt to handle HTTP-based authentication.

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[sends a virtual beer to Remy] That just solved everything, and answers my prior question too :-) –  Jerry Dodge Dec 17 '13 at 1:25
    
Specifically the hoInProcessAuth part is what fixed it all –  Jerry Dodge Dec 17 '13 at 1:34

This is because the HTTP Negotiate authentication method is used:

"NTLM and Negotiate (RFC-4559) is most commonly used on Microsoft IIS web servers. NTLM can be used exclusively, but modern servers typically use Negotiate to select which scheme will be used. The result is usually NTLM'

Microsoft explains it e.g. here (see Figure 1)

If you Google for http request negotiation www-authenticate you'll find more info.

As an illustration, this is the HTTP that I see if SOAPUI makes an authenticated connection to Exchange web services:

1>  >> "POST /ews/exchange.asmx HTTP/1.1[\r][\n]"
    >> "Accept-Encoding: gzip,deflate[\r][\n]"
    >> "SOAPAction: "http://schemas.microsoft.com/exchange/services/2006/messages/ResolveNames"[\r][\n]"
    >> "Content-Type: text/xml; charset=utf-8[\r][\n]"
    >> "Content-Length: 548[\r][\n]"
    >> "Host: webmail.ttbv.nl[\r][\n]"
    >> "Connection: Keep-Alive[\r][\n]"
    >> "User-Agent: Apache-HttpClient/4.1.1 (java 1.5)[\r][\n]"
    >> "[\r][\n]"
    >> "<soapenv:Envelope [\n]"
    [snip]
    >> "</soapenv:Envelope>[\n]"
    >> "[\n]"

1<  << "HTTP/1.1 401 Unauthorized[\r][\n]"
    << "Cache-Control: private[\r][\n]"
    << "Server: Microsoft-IIS/7.5[\r][\n]"
    << "X-AspNet-Version: 2.0.50727[\r][\n]"
    << "Set-Cookie: exchangecookie=a29f10ca2a6d484ea276737e87d8e733; expires=Wed, 13-Nov-2013 10:47:33 GMT; path=/; HttpOnly[\r][\n]"
    << "WWW-Authenticate: Negotiate[\r][\n]"
    << "WWW-Authenticate: NTLM[\r][\n]"
    << "X-Powered-By: ASP.NET[\r][\n]"
    << "Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2012 10:47:33 GMT[\r][\n]"
    << "Content-Length: 0[\r][\n]"
    << "[\r][\n]"

2>  >> "POST /ews/exchange.asmx HTTP/1.1[\r][\n]"
    >> "Accept-Encoding: gzip,deflate[\r][\n]"
    >> "SOAPAction: "http://schemas.microsoft.com/exchange/services/2006/messages/ResolveNames"[\r][\n]"
    >> "Content-Type: text/xml; charset=utf-8[\r][\n]"
    >> "Content-Length: 548[\r][\n]"
    >> "Host: webmail.ttbv.nl[\r][\n]"
    >> "Connection: Keep-Alive[\r][\n]"
    >> "User-Agent: Apache-HttpClient/4.1.1 (java 1.5)[\r][\n]"
    >> "Cookie: exchangecookie=a29f10ca2a6d484ea276737e87d8e733[\r][\n]"
    >> "Cookie2: $Version=1[\r][\n]"
    >> "Authorization: NTLM TlRMTVNTUAAB[snip]QgBWAA==[\r][\n]"
    >> "[\r][\n]"
    >> "<soapenv:Envelope [\n]"
    [snip]
    >> "</soapenv:Envelope>[\n]"
    >> "[\n]"

2<  << "HTTP/1.1 401 Unauthorized[\r][\n]"
    << "Server: Microsoft-IIS/7.5[\r][\n]"
    << "WWW-Authenticate: NTLM TlRMTVNTU[snip]AACAAAAFAAAAA==[\r][\n]"
    << "WWW-Authenticate: Negotiate[\r][\n]"
    << "X-Powered-By: ASP.NET[\r][\n]"
    << "Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2012 10:47:33 GMT[\r][\n]"
    << "Content-Length: 0[\r][\n]"
    << "[\r][\n]"

3>  >> "POST /ews/exchange.asmx HTTP/1.1[\r][\n]"
    >> "Accept-Encoding: gzip,deflate[\r][\n]"
    >> "SOAPAction: "http://schemas.microsoft.com/exchange/services/2006/messages/ResolveNames"[\r][\n]"
    >> "Content-Type: text/xml; charset=utf-8[\r][\n]"
    >> "Content-Length: 548[\r][\n]"
    >> "Host: webmail.ttbv.nl[\r][\n]"
    >> "Connection: Keep-Alive[\r][\n]"
    >> "User-Agent: Apache-HttpClient/4.1.1 (java 1.5)[\r][\n]"
    >> "Cookie: exchangecookie=a29f10ca2a6d484ea276737e87d8e733[\r][\n]"
    >> "Cookie2: $Version=1[\r][\n]"
    >> "Authorization: NTLM TlRMTVNT[snip]AVABUADcANAA=[\r][\n]"
    >> "[\r][\n]"
    >> "<soapenv:Envelope [\n]"
    [snip]
    >> "</soapenv:Envelope>[\n]"
    >> "[\n]"

3<  << "HTTP/1.1 200 OK[\r][\n]"
    << "Cache-Control: private[\r][\n]"
    << "Transfer-Encoding: chunked[\r][\n]"
    << "Content-Type: text/xml; charset=utf-8[\r][\n]"
    << "Server: Microsoft-IIS/7.5[\r][\n]"
    << "X-EwsPerformanceData: RpcC=2;RpcL=0;LdapC=1;LdapL=0;[\r][\n]"
    << "X-AspNet-Version: 2.0.50727[\r][\n]"
    << "Persistent-Auth: true[\r][\n]"
    << "X-Powered-By: ASP.NET[\r][\n]"
    << "Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2012 10:47:33 GMT[\r][\n]"
    << "[\r][\n]"
    << "877[\r][\n]"
    << "<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?><s:Envelope xmlns:s="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/envelope/">
    [snip]
    << "</s:Envelope>"
    << "[\r][\n]"
    << "0[\r][\n]"
    << "[\r][\n]"

In the first received HTTP block the server tells me what protocols I can use.

So the second request is not, as you write if authentication fails, it is by design; hence no username and password have to be sent with the first request.

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Yes, however, TIdHTTP is designed to handle such cases and automatically send subsequent authentication requires without requiring the user to do so manually. –  Remy Lebeau Dec 16 '13 at 21:12

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