Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

The code below was compiled without error:

std::string lastName, chldName;
while([&]()
{
      return true;
})
{
  //codes...
}   

But when I tried this way:

std::string lastName, chldName;
while([&]()
{
      std::cin >>lastName;
      return true;
})
{
  //codes...
}   

The compiler complained that :

error: could not convert 'main()::{(* & lastName)}' from 'main()::' to 'bool'

How to understand this error?Is it possible to use lambda this way?

share|improve this question
1  
I don't think this should compile, did you forget a () to call the lambda? – dyp Dec 16 '13 at 10:21
    
@DyP +1 and yes you are right. I think I did not understand what is a lambda.Thanks! – Yue Wang Dec 16 '13 at 10:55
up vote 9 down vote accepted

Your first example works not how you want, it's equivalent to while (true), since lambda will be converted to function-pointer, that will be converted to bool (true) - it should be

while([&]()
{
   return true;
}())

Note to call of lambda

Your second example will not compile without call of lambda, since you are trying to access to catched-variables, thats forbids conversion from lambda to function-pointer, that can be converted to bool, but it will neither compiled with (),

If a lambda-expression does not include a trailing-return-type, it is as if the trailing-return-type denotes the following type:

— if the compound-statement is of the form { attribute-specifier-seqopt return expression ; } the type of the returned expression after lvalue-to-rvalue conversion (4.1), array-to-pointer conver- sion (4.2), and function-to-pointer conversion (4.3);

— otherwise, void.

In your case, return type will be deduced to void, but since you return bool, you should use trailing-return-type

while([&]() -> bool
{
      std::cin >>lastName;
      return true;
}())
share|improve this answer
    
The reason is that type deduction for lambdas in C++11 only works when the lambda consists of a single line, which is a return-statement. – dyp Dec 16 '13 at 10:23
    
@ForEveR I put a "-> bool" like you did. It still complained the same thing. – Yue Wang Dec 16 '13 at 10:26
    
This is not the problem. – Cheers and hth. - Alf Dec 16 '13 at 10:28
    
@Cheersandhth.-Alf How about updated? – ForEveR Dec 16 '13 at 10:33
    
@ForEveR Now it works. Being a newbie I need a little bit of time to think about your answer and comments! Many Thanks! – Yue Wang Dec 16 '13 at 10:37

There is no need to explicitly express the return type,the issue is that you are asking the while loops condition whether the lambda function its self is true, rather than the value it returns.

You actually need to the call lambda function in the loop condition.

while([] {
    return true;
 }()) {
 ///....
 }

EDIT

The reason the first compiles and the second doesn't is because the first doesn't capture anything. The standard allows this to then be converted to a normal function pointer which can be evaluated as a bool (nullptr being false).

The second captures, which stops the compiler from converting it to a function pointer and thus doesn't compile.

share|improve this answer
    
Is the same problem you would have with a named funcion: while(returnTrue()) would work, while(returnTrue) would not. – Coffee on Mars Dec 16 '13 at 10:25
    
yes that is correct. – 111111 Dec 16 '13 at 10:25
1  
@CoffeeonMars A function name can be converted to a function pointer, which in turn can be converted to bool. Therefore, while(foo) does compile for some function foo, e.g. void foo();. – dyp Dec 16 '13 at 10:26
    
@DyP you are correct, I forgot that conversion. For the sake of completeness, it rises a warning on VC2012. – Coffee on Mars Dec 16 '13 at 10:29
    
AFAIK, the Standard does not allow the first to be converted to a function pointer; even though it doesn't capture anything it still has a lambda-capture. See [expr.prim.lambda]/6 – dyp Dec 16 '13 at 10:29

Note that in your code you're NOT CALLING the lambda.

while([&]()
{
      return true;
})

With no call it's not the lambda's return value that is problematic.

A lambda that doesn't capture anything can be implicitly converted to function pointer, which in turn can convert to bool.

The following compiles with g++ 4.7.2, but not with Visual C++ 12.0:

int main()
{
    if( [](){} ) {}
}

The following, where the lambda does capture (and thus cannot be converted), doesn't compile with either compiler:

int main()
{
    int x;
    if( [&](){(void)x;} ) {}
}
share|improve this answer
    
Which applies to both examples; but AFAIK neither should compile. – dyp Dec 16 '13 at 10:20
    
@DyP: an implicit conversion pointer was used by C++03 isotreams, to provide implicit conversion to bool. – Cheers and hth. - Alf Dec 16 '13 at 10:31
    
I'm not sure what iostreams have to do with this example o.O Anyway, the Standard specifies the existence of the function-pointer conversion depending on the existence of a lambda-capture (the thing inside the []), not if the lambda captures anything. Which makes the first example while([&]{ return true; }) ill-formed as well. – dyp Dec 16 '13 at 10:33
    
@Cheersandhth.-Alf I need a little bit of time to read and think about your reply, many thanks! – Yue Wang Dec 16 '13 at 10:40
    
@Cheersandhth.-Alf +1, thx for your explanation! – Yue Wang Dec 16 '13 at 11:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.