Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

would you please help me how to convert every 4-sequantial rows into one tab-separated column?

convert:

A
1
2
3
3
3
4
1

to :

A   1  2  3
3   3  4  1
share|improve this question
1  
what does one tab-separated column mean? e.g. A<TAB>1<space>2<space>3? –  Kent Dec 16 '13 at 10:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

A simple way to do this is to use xargs:

$ xargs -n4 < file
A 1 2 3
3 3 4 1

With awk you would do:

$ awk '{printf "%s%s",$0,(NR%4?FS:RS)}' file
A 1 2 3
3 3 4 1

Another flexible approach is to use pr:

$ pr -tas' ' --columns 4 file
A 1 2 3
3 3 4 1

Both the awk and pr solution can be easily modified to change the output separator to a TAB:

$ pr -at --columns 4 file
A         1         2             3
3         3         4             1                        

$ awk '{printf "%s%s",$0,(NR%4?OFS:RS)}' OFS='\t' file
A         1         2             3
3         3         4             1
share|improve this answer
    
+1: 3 neat ways of doing it. –  Olivier Dulac Dec 16 '13 at 10:36
    
+1, wasn't aware of such usage of xargs –  slayedbylucifer Dec 16 '13 at 10:38
    
Also paste - - - - file and -d to set the separator char. –  glenn jackman Dec 16 '13 at 10:56
    
@glennjackman only problem is it doesn't scale.. I wonder if an elegant way exist to generate n - dynamically, I don't think one does? –  iiSeymour Dec 16 '13 at 11:04
    
I guess you could do n=5 cols=$(printf -- "-%d " $(seq $n) | tr -d '[:digit:]'); paste $cols file –  glenn jackman Dec 16 '13 at 16:49
$ perl -pe 's{\n$}{\t} if $. % 4' old.file > new.file

or simply (thanks to mpapec's comment):

$ perl -pe 'tr_\n_\t_ if $. % 4' old.file > new.file
share|improve this answer
    
I guess anchoring is not needed, so just y|\n|\t| .. –  Сухой27 Dec 16 '13 at 12:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.