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I have a problem compiling the following code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <limits.h>
int main () {
    printf("short: [%d,%d]\n",SHRT_MIN,SHRT_MAX);
    printf("int: [%d, %d]\n",INT_MIN, INT_MAX);
    printf("long: [%d, %d]\n",LONG_MIN,LONG_MAX);
    int aa=017;
    printf("%d\n",aa);
    return 0;
}

Error message is:

1>c:\tic\ex1\ex2\ex2.c(12) : error C2143: syntax error : missing ';' before 'type'
1>c:\tic\ex1\ex2\ex2.c(13) : error C2065: 'aa' : undeclared identifier

However, compilation for this is fine:

    #include <stdio.h>
    #include <limits.h>
    int main () {
        int aa=017;
        printf("short: [%d,%d]\n",SHRT_MIN,SHRT_MAX);
        printf("int: [%d, %d]\n",INT_MIN, INT_MAX);
        printf("long: [%d, %d]\n",LONG_MIN,LONG_MAX);
        printf("%d\n",aa);
        return 0;
    }

Any idea what the issue is?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 10 down vote accepted

In C, variables previously had to be declared at the top of the scope, before any code is executed. This isn't the case in C99 (which Visual Studio doesn't implement.)

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I'm not sure if that restriction was removed earlier than C99. –  GManNickG Jan 13 '10 at 22:46
    
C89 (aka C90) requires declarations to appear at the top of a block, but not necessarily function. Many compilers support declarations anywhere as an extension but this definitely isn't C90. –  Charles Bailey Jan 13 '10 at 22:48
    
if you tell the VC++ compiler to compile C code (and not C++) code it will default to an archaic profile of C (possibly older than C89). Just let the compiler compile C++, if you want to trim down the code generated use compiler switches -- for example disabling the exception mechanism and such. –  Hassan Syed Jan 13 '10 at 23:13

Visual Studio doesn't support C99 so all declarations (such as for aa in your example) in a block must appear before any statements (such as your printf calls).

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In (old) C, you cannot declare a variable anywhere as you can in C++ or in the latest C standards. You have to declare it directly after the open curly brace of a scope, as in your second example.

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In C prior to C99, all variables in a given scope have to be defined before other statements in that scope. Though it initially looks the same, this isn't quite the same as GMan's answer. In particular, a function can contain other blocks that define other scopes, and those can define variables after executable statements in the outer block:

int main() { 
    int x;

    printf("whatever");
    int y; // not allowed

    { 
         int z;    // allowed
    }
    return 0;
}

While defining a block like this (that's not associated with any flow control like an if statement or while loop) is fairly uncommon, it is allowed as a part of C.

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up for interesting answer –  segfault Jan 13 '10 at 23:28

In "classic" C language (C89/90) declarations are not allowed to appear in the middle of the code. Your original declaration of aa would be valid in C++ or in the "new" C (C99), but not in C89/90.

VS 2008 comes with the C89/90 compiler, which is why you get these errors.

On top of that, the proper printf format specifier for priting long values is %ld, not %d.

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change the file type to cpp then it will work (and you can add c++ to your resume)

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I sure hope people can't add languages on resumes by renaming files. :) –  GManNickG Jan 13 '10 at 22:48
    
I'm just trying to go retro –  segfault Jan 13 '10 at 22:48
    
there's more to that actually, change stdio to cstdio, add using namespace std; but anyway, I'm just learning C for fun. –  segfault Jan 13 '10 at 23:27
    
nope - all else will compile fine, no need for cstdio, namespace or anything –  pm100 Jan 14 '10 at 0:34

Unless you explicitly tell it to compile as C, doesn;t visual studio compile .c files as c++ anyway? You can certainly use // commnets

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