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I have a requirement where I will check the length of each line in a file using perl-regex and regex is supposed to match only if the length is 9 or 10 chars long.

Current regex: /^(.{9,10})$/

Sample input:
D   ABCD12
D   ABCD1
D   ABCD123
D   ABCD12
D   ABCD
D   ABCD1

"D   ABCD123" and "D   ABCD", should not be matched remaining are to be matched.

Somehow my regex is not giving me desired results, where am i going wrong?

I am testing here: http://www.regexplanet.com/advanced/perl/index.html

Adding following details based on comments: ( I am using some shitty internal framework for these matching). My result from test: 1) Input as above, regex as above 2) Selected m (multi-line) and g (global) options

Output:
$var = $input =~ /$regex/g
$var=1
$`=D   ABCD12 

$&=D   ABCD1 
$'=
D   ABCD123 
D   ABCD12 
D   ABCD 

-----------------------------------------
split($regex, $input)
[0]=D   ABCD12 

[1]=D   ABCD1 
[2]=
D   ABCD123 
D   ABCD12 

[3]=D   ABCD 
[4]=

[5]=D   ABCD1
D   ABCD1
share|improve this question
1  
Make sure you use the m modifier. –  HamZa Dec 16 '13 at 11:24
2  
How are you performing the match? It is quite important to know. We can always make assumptions, but in the long run it gets tedious to guess. Post working code including input, show what it outputs and what you expected it to output. –  TLP Dec 16 '13 at 11:27
3  
Are you reading the sample input row by row? Which results do you get? You need to give some more details, the regex itself does look OK. –  stema Dec 16 '13 at 11:27
    
Note that /^(.{9,10})$/ can match "123457890\n" (11 chars). Use \z instead of $ to fix that. –  ikegami Dec 16 '13 at 15:06
    
I think using a regex to calculate the length of a string is possibly one of the least efficient ways to do it... It's at least a fair distance from being the most efficient... –  twalberg Dec 16 '13 at 15:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The regex is correct. (The outer parentheses are unnecessary, though).

In a regex tester, if you're using a multi-line string for testing, you need to use the m and g modifiers: http://regex101.com/r/tI3iA3

In your code, that means:

@var = $input =~ m/^.{9,10}$/mg;
share|improve this answer
    
I am using this regex in my "framework" s/^(.{9,10})$/ TEMP $1 /gm. But somehow the "TEMP" variable does not have correct information line wise, Though the example you have shown works perfect. –  user1933888 Dec 16 '13 at 11:52
    
really liked your regex101.com link –  nrathaus Dec 16 '13 at 12:25
    
@ikegami: Thanks, I'm a stranger to Perl; I've edited the code sample according to what RegexBuddy is suggesting - is this better? –  Tim Pietzcker Dec 16 '13 at 16:55
    
Yes, much better –  ikegami Dec 16 '13 at 17:45

This works for me - I think your regex is fine, so the problem must be the way you are reading in lines and testing them against the regex.

use strict;

open(FILE,"<test.txt");
while (my $line = <FILE>) {

    chomp($line);

    if ($line =~ /^(.{9,10})$/) {
        print "Matched\n";
    } else {
        print "Not Matched\n";
    }

}
close(FILE);
share|improve this answer

you can do it with this code:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use Encode; 

while (my $line = <DATA>) {
    chomp($line);

    print "\n$line\t";

    if ( length(Encode::decode_utf8($line)) ~~ [9..10] ) {
        print "true";
    } else {
        print "false";
    }
}

__DATA__
D   ABCD12
D   ABCD1
D   ABCD123
D   ABCD12
D   ABCD
D   ÄŒcd1
share|improve this answer
    
You should never ever use _utf8_on. If you do, you are doing something wrong. In this case, you want $line = Encode::decode('utf8', $line);, $line = Encode::decode_utf8($line);, utf8::decode($line);, etc. –  ikegami Dec 16 '13 at 15:02
    
~~ is experimental and warn as such in 5.18+ –  ikegami Dec 16 '13 at 15:04
    
This will be far slower than a regex solution. –  ikegami Dec 16 '13 at 15:05
    
@ikegami: Thanks, it is what I am looking for. –  Casimir et Hippolyte Dec 16 '13 at 15:54
    
@ikegami: I use 5.14 and I have no warnings. –  Casimir et Hippolyte Dec 16 '13 at 15:54

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