Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here microsoft described that in wpf 4.5 we can use INotifypropertyChanged for static properties as well. So I tried to do that.

Here is the code:

public static event PropertyChangedEventHandler StaticPropertyChanged;
    protected static void OnStaticPropertyChanged(string PropertyName)
    {
        PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = StaticPropertyChanged;
        if (handler != null)
        {
            handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(PropertyName));
        }
    }

But I dont know what to use instead of this keyword in the above code?

Here is my code:

public static event PropertyChangedEventHandler StaticPropertyChanged;
protected static void OnStaticPropertyChanged(string PropertyName)
{
    PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = StaticPropertyChanged;
    if (handler != null)
    {
        handler(typeof(MainWindowViewModel), new PropertyChangedEventArgs(PropertyName));
    }
}

private static Haemogram _cHaemogram;
public static Haemogram cHaemogram
{
    get
    {
        return _cHaemogram;
    }
    set
    {
        _cHaemogram = value;
        OnStaticPropertyChanged("cHaemogram");
    }
}
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Think that you added this to your viewmodel :

  yourClass.StaticPropertyChanged+= yourClassStaticPropertyChanged;

...

  void yourClassStaticPropertyChanged(object sender, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
        {

        }

The "this" keyword refers the "object sender" parameter. If you use "this" in your code while creating handler, it refers "sender" in yourClassStaticPropertyChanged function. If you send null, the sender parameter will be null.

--Edit--

If you want to get changes to the textbox add this code to your viewmodel :

private string _updatedText;
public string UpdatedText
{
  get
  {
      return _updatedText;
  }
  set
  {
      _updatedText= value;
      OnStaticPropertyChanged("UpdatedText")
  }
}

And set UpdatedText in the event :

void yourClassStaticPropertyChanged(object sender, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
        {
                UpdatedText=e.NewValue;
        }

then bind the UpdatedText to your textbox like this :

<TextBlock Text="{Binding UpdatedText}"/>
share|improve this answer
    
No, I have not added the code that you mentioned. If I want to add the above code then (1) where should the first line of your code I declare? (2) What should I write between the curly braces in above code? –  Khushi Dec 16 '13 at 15:51
    
what is your aim? what do you want to do exactly? –  seckin Dec 17 '13 at 12:56
    
I have used your code in the constructor of the MainWindowViewModel. Now the event is being raised. But Changes are not returned to the TextBox. Anyway if you can help then I have uploaded a demo project stating my problem. drive.google.com/file/d/0Bw2XAE1EBI6rTVRkSUNBUWpNbFE/… –  Khushi Dec 17 '13 at 13:09
    
Can you join the chat chat.stackoverflow.com/rooms/43329/… –  Khushi Dec 17 '13 at 13:10
    
edited the answer –  seckin Dec 17 '13 at 13:42

Unless anything uses the sender parameter, it won't matter. Logically it would make sense to use the type:

handler(typeof(TypeDeclaringEvent), new PropertyChangedEventArgs(PropertyName));

EDIT: Note that in the document you referred to, it states:

The static event can use either of the following signatures.

   public static event EventHandler MyPropertyChanged;
   public static event EventHandler<PropertyChangedEventArgs> StaticPropertyChanged;

Your event doesn't comply with these, which could be an issue.

share|improve this answer
    
I dont understand what do you mean by TypeDeclaringEvent –  Khushi Dec 16 '13 at 13:30
    
He means the name of the class that this is declared in. –  dav_i Dec 16 '13 at 13:31
    
@Khushi: Whatever type is declaring the event - you haven't shown it in your sample code, so I couldn't guess a type name. –  Jon Skeet Dec 16 '13 at 13:31
1  
@Khushi: Yes, but I mean in your debugging, are you checking that it's actually being raised - that you're getting to that code? And that anything has actually subscribed to the event? Currently you've given us very little information... –  Jon Skeet Dec 16 '13 at 13:51
1  
@Khushi: You've misunderstood the point of creating the smaller project. It doesn't matter that you wouldn't need a static property on just one page (although I'd say that's a design flaw anyway - you shouldn't use a static property for that IMO) - it matters that you try to demonstrate the problem as simply as possible. I'm afraid I don't have time to continue this discussion further. –  Jon Skeet Dec 16 '13 at 18:19

You have to make your created property "static" and not the PropertyChangedEventHandler.

public event PropertyChangedEventHandler StaticPropertyChanged;

protected void OnStaticPropertyChanged(string PropertyName)
{
    PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = StaticPropertyChanged;
    if (handler != null)
    {
        handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(PropertyName));
    }
}

Now the static property is:

private static string _propertyName;

public static string PropertyName
{
  get
  {
      return _propertyName;
  }
  set
  {
      _propertyName = value;
      OnStaticPropertyChanged("PropertyName")
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why the down vote for the post? –  Ravi Patel Dec 16 '13 at 13:44
    
I have not Down vote this post. But still the question is to replace this keyword with some another word but you have not answered specific to question. –  Khushi Dec 16 '13 at 13:47
    
You've created a static field but a non-static property... –  Jon Skeet Dec 16 '13 at 14:07
    
Now is it Okay? @Jon Skeet –  Ravi Patel Dec 16 '13 at 14:25
    
@RaviPatel: Nope, it wouldn't compile - because you're trying to call your instance method from the static property... –  Jon Skeet Dec 16 '13 at 14:32

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.