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I have an array of elements combined with # which I wish to put in hash , first element of that array as key and rest as value after splitting of that array elements by # But it is not happening.

Ex:

my @arr = qw(9093#AT#BP 8111#BR 7456#VD#AP 7786#WS#ER 9431#BP ) #thousand of data 

What I want is

$hash{9093} = [AT,AP];
$hash{8111} = [BR]; and so on

How we can accomplish it using map function. Otherwise I need to use for loop but I wish to use map function.

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You should run your Perl code with use strict and use warnings in effect. For example: Possible attempt to put comments in qw() list. –  FMc Dec 16 '13 at 14:44

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted
my %hash = map { my ($k, @v) = split /#/; $k => \@v } @arr;

For comparison, the corresponding foreach loop follows:

my %hash;
for (@arr) {
   my ($k, @v) = split /#/;
   $hash{$k} = \@v;
}
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Thank you ikegami, Your answer is similar to tobyink. So, I would choose his answer as best. Thank you guys for such a fast response. –  Jassi Dec 16 '13 at 16:07
    
If you're going to format the code as his answer, then you'd be better off using a foreach loop! –  ikegami Dec 16 '13 at 16:25
    
But if you both have written the same code, only diff is variable name though I used your code. Thank you all –  Jassi Dec 17 '13 at 5:23

Use split to split on '#', taking the first chunk as the key, and keeping the rest in an array. Then create a hash using the keys and references to the arrays.

use Data::Dumper;

my @arr  = qw( 9093#AT#BP 8111#BR 7456#VD#AP 7786#WS#ER 9431#BP );
my %hash = map {
   my ($key, @vals) = split '#', $_;
   $key => \@vals;
} @arr;

print Dumper \%hash;
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Thanks Tobyink. It didn't come in my mind that we can assign and write some codes like this. Very well done! It helped –  Jassi Dec 16 '13 at 16:05

No effort shown in your question, but I am on a code freeze so I'll bite :)

A think that a for loop would be more idiomatic Perl here, process the elements one-by-one, split on # and then assign into your hash:

use strict;
use warnings; 
use Data::Dumper;

my @arr = qw(9093#AT#BP 8111#BR 7456#VD#AP 7786#WS#ER 9431#BP );
my %h;

for my $elem ( @arr ) {
   my ($key, @vals) = split /#/, $elem; 

   $h{$key} = \@vals;
}
print Dumper \%h;
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That is easy:

%s = (map {split(/#/, $_, 2)} @arr);

Testing it:

$ cat 1.pl
my @arr = qw(9093#AT#BP 8111#BR 7456#VD#AP 7786#WS#ER 9431#BP );
%s = (map {split(/#/, $_, 2)} @arr);
foreach my $key ( keys %s )
{
  print "key: $key, value: $s{$key}\n";
}

$ perl 1.pl
key: 7456, value: VD#AP
key: 8111, value: BR
key: 7786, value: WS#ER
key: 9431, value: BP
key: 9093, value: AT#BP
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1  
Not quite. Does 9093 => 'AT#BP' instead of 9093 => [ 'AT', 'BP' ] –  ikegami Dec 16 '13 at 14:43
use strict;
use warnings; 
use Data::Dumper;

my @arr = ('9093#AT#BP', '8111#BR', '7456#VD#AP', '7786#WS#ER', '9431#BP' );
my %h = map { map { splice(@$_, 0, 1), $_ } [ split /#/ ] } @arr;
print Dumper \%h;
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