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We are given a large number 'num', which can have upto 10^4 digits ,( num<= 10^(10000) ) , we need to find the count of number of zeroes in the decimal representation starting from 1 upto 'num'.

eg: 
countZeros('9') = 0
countZeros('100') = 11
countZeros('219') = 41

The only way i could think of is to do brute force,which obviously is too slow for large inputs.

I found the following python code in this link ,which does the required in O(L),L being length of 'num'.

def CountZeros(num):
    Z = 0
    N = 0
    F = 0
    for j in xrange(len(num)):
        F = 10*F + N - Z*(9-int(num[j]))
        if num[j] == '0':
            Z += 1
        N = 10*N + int(num[j])
    return F

I can't understand the logic behind it..Any kind of help will be appreciated.

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I guess you should really ask on math.stackexchange.com :) I can understand the logic of the code; however understanding the math behind it might take a few more minutes than I have spare :) –  James Mills Dec 16 '13 at 15:23
1  
Sounds like a project euler problem. writing down the numbers with zeros in them will help to figure out the pattern. And then you'll probably see the logic in the code also. –  M4rtini Dec 16 '13 at 15:30
    
Have you tried littering the function with print(s) and see what the invariant(s) are through the loop? –  James Mills Dec 16 '13 at 15:31
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2 Answers 2

from 0 - 9 : 0 zeros
from 10 - 99: 9 zeros ( 10, 20, ... 90)

--100-199 explained-----------------------
100, 101, ..., 109 : 11 zeros (two in 100)
110, 120, ..., 199:  9 zeros (this is just the same as 10-99) This is important
Total: 20
------------------------------------------

100 - 999: 20 * 9 = 180 

total up to 999 is: 180 + 9: 189
CountZeros('999') -> 189 

Continu this pattern and you might start to see the overall pattern and eventually the algorithm.

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Does the following help you're understanding:

>>> for i in range(10, 100, 10):
...     print(CountZeros(str(i)))
... 
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
>>> 

What about this:

>>> CountZeros("30")
j Z N F
0 0 0 0

j Z N F
0 0 3 0

j Z N F
1 0 3 0

j Z N F
1 1 30 3

3
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1  
(your understanding) :) –  Groo Dec 16 '13 at 15:52
    
Yeah well I really don't want to give away the answer now do i? :) –  James Mills Dec 16 '13 at 15:55
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