Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am a novice to Python/matplotlib so please bear with me! I have a list of epoch timestamps across several days and a boolean indicating whether an event occurred or not. I want to plot this using matplotlib with time on x-axis and Y-axis showing 1/0 and I see SO examples plotting time in python with matplotlib for doing this.

However, I want to ignore the yr/month/date and plot only again time, i.e. 8 AM time on 1-Dec and 8 AM time on 2-Dec use the same X-axis coordinate.

Edit: Here is the current code:

import time
import datetime
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import matplotlib.dates as mdates

event = [
(1384528771000000000, 1),
(1384550132000000000, 0),
(1384881104000000000, 0),
(1384962750000000000, 1),
(1384966615000000000, 1),
(1385049149000000000, 1),
(1385053051000000000, 0),
(1385053939000000000, 0),
(1385140573000000000, 1),
(1385393839000000000, 1),
(1385398965000000000, 0),
(1385410739000000000, 1),
(1385483309000000000, 1),
(1385587272000000000, 0),
(1385998456000000000, 1),
(1386084047000000000, 0),
(1386085865000000000, 1),
(1386259016000000000, 0),
(1386345606000000000, 0),
(1386602368000000000, 1)
]

for line in event:
    timeStmp = datetime.datetime.strptime(time.ctime(line[0]/1000000000), "%a %b %d %H:%M:%S %Y")
    print timeStmp, mdates.date2num(timeStmp)
    plt.plot_date(mdates.date2num(timeStmp),line[1])
plt.show()
share|improve this question
1  
You need to show us your code... Or just google matlab plot –  inquisitiveIdiot Dec 16 '13 at 16:24
1  
@inquisitiveIdiot note this is a matplotlib/python, not MATLAB question. –  tcaswell Dec 16 '13 at 18:28
    
What have you tried? You will get much better help fixing broken code than asking us to write your code for you. You just need to convert your time stamps to datetime objects, then drop the date part. You should be able to directly plot the time vs your y values. –  tcaswell Dec 16 '13 at 18:30

2 Answers 2

So the only thing I'm doing differently here, is taking your date/time stamps, converting to a string of just time data, then using mdates to convert that time string to a number. Crude and inefficient, but I think it's what you want.

for line in event:
    datetimeStamp = datetime.datetime.strptime(time.ctime(line[0]/1000000000), "%a %b %d %H:%M:%S %Y")
    timeStamp = datetimeStamp.strftime('%H:%M:%S')

    print(timeStamp, mdates.datestr2num(timeStamp))
    plt.plot_date(mdates.datestr2num(timeStamp),line[1])
plt.show()
share|improve this answer

Here is one way to do this, just plot the time difference between the beginning of the day and the time in the timestamp:

import time
import datetime
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import matplotlib.dates as mdates
import matplotlib

event = [
(1384528771000000000, 1),
(1384550132000000000, 0),
(1384881104000000000, 0),
(1384962750000000000, 1),
(1384966615000000000, 1),
(1385049149000000000, 1),
(1385053051000000000, 0),
(1385053939000000000, 0),
(1385140573000000000, 1),
(1385393839000000000, 1),
(1385398965000000000, 0),
(1385410739000000000, 1),
(1385483309000000000, 1),
(1385587272000000000, 0),
(1385998456000000000, 1),
(1386084047000000000, 0),
(1386085865000000000, 1),
(1386259016000000000, 0),
(1386345606000000000, 0),
(1386602368000000000, 1)
]

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(111)

for line in event:
    timeStmp = datetime.datetime.strptime(time.ctime(line[0]/1000000000), "%a %b %d %H:%M:%S %Y")
    print timeStmp, mdates.date2num(timeStmp)
    tdelta = timeStmp - datetime.datetime.strptime(str(timeStmp.year) + " " + str(timeStmp.month) + " " + str(timeStmp.day) + " 00:00:00", "%Y %m %d %H:%M:%S")
    ax.plot(tdelta.total_seconds(),line[1], 'o')

def timeTicks(x, pos):
    d = datetime.timedelta(seconds=x)
    return str(d)
formatter = matplotlib.ticker.FuncFormatter(timeTicks)
ax.xaxis.set_major_formatter(formatter)
plt.show()
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.