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What's the difference between:

typedef struct part 
{
   int a;
} Part;

and

typedef struct 
{
   int a;
} Part;

I know the second one is "anonymous" but are they different?

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4  
In the second case, you won't be able to refer to the type as struct part. The difference is significant while you are making a self-referencing (list or tree) data structure where struct part *child must be a member of the struct. –  user529758 Dec 16 '13 at 16:52
    
@SylvainDefresne It's also valid C++ code and OP didn't say they're only interested in C. –  jrok Dec 16 '13 at 16:56
1  
Potential usage for self-referencing aside, there's no runtime difference between these two structs. If that was the main gist of your question. –  jarmod Dec 16 '13 at 16:59
    
They have different names, same difference as struct A { } and struct B { } –  Inverse Dec 20 '13 at 0:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 18 down vote accepted

In addition to Mike Seymour answer, here's an example of why:

Linked list for example

// this works
typedef struct part {
    struct part *next;
} Part;

// this doesn't work
typedef struct {
    struct Part *next;
} Part;
// neither this
typedef struct {
    Part *next;
} Part;
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Why? What's the point of making that restriction? Why aren't you allowed to do the second thing? –  dfg Dec 16 '13 at 16:59
4  
How could the compiler know what is Part (in the second example) when it's not defined yet ? –  EoiFirst Dec 16 '13 at 17:00
    
But then how can the compiler know what struct part *next is when its definition hasn't been completed yet? –  dfg Dec 16 '13 at 17:04
1  
@dfg The compiler doesn't need to know about the definition of the class, as long as it knows it's there. It's like forward declaring something. –  s3rius Dec 16 '13 at 17:06
1  
@dfg You don't need a complete type definition for a pointer or reference. You only need to know the type exists. –  Sam Cristall Dec 16 '13 at 17:07

In both cases you define a structure type, and a type alias called Part which refers to that type.

In the first case, you also define a structure name part, so the structure type can also be referred to as struct part, or just part in C++.

In the second case, the structure itself has no name (hence "anonymous"), and can only be referred to by the type alias. Since that alias is only declared after the structure definition, the structure cannot refer to itself.

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1  
But why would you care how you can refer to it as long as you can refer to it? –  dfg Dec 16 '13 at 16:53
    
@dfg: You can only refer to it within the structure definition (before the declaration of Part) by the structure name - and only if it has one. –  Mike Seymour Dec 16 '13 at 16:56
    
Why? What's the point of making that restriction? Why aren't you allowed to self reference it? –  dfg Dec 16 '13 at 16:59
1  
@dfg: In general, you can only use names after they've been declared. The point of that restriction is to allow the program to be parsed in a single pass, making compilation much quicker than it otherwise would be. –  Mike Seymour Dec 16 '13 at 17:04

And in addition to @EoiFirst 's answer,

typedef struct part 
{
   int a;
   struct part *next;
} Part;

This is valid because next is a pointer to struct part, so it has the size of a pointer-type.

C is a typed language, so the compiler knows the type of next, and after struct part is fully defined, it will be able to determine that the code below is valid. It knows that next is a pointer to struct part, that has a field int a.

void test(struct part *p) {
    if (p != NULL && p->next != NULL) {
        printf("%d\n", p->next->a); // this is valid
    }
}

You could declare

typedef struct part 
{
   int a;
   void *next;
} Part;

The size of struct part would still be the same as the declared above. Now next is a pointer to anything, and the code with test() above would compile with error.

warning: dereferencing 'void *' pointer
error: request for member 'a' in something not a structure or union

You would need to write printf("%d\n", ((struct part *) p->next)->a);

Also, you will not be able to declare this,

typedef struct part 
{
   int a;
   struct part nested;
} Part;

You will get a compiler error.

error: field 'nested' has incomplete type
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@MikeSeymur and others gave great answers. I want to add an important point nobody stated explicitly.

In large projects it is important to keep headers rather minimal and avoid #include-ing other headers unless absolutely necessary.

Assume that your structure is defined in some header file part.h. The named structure type Part defined allows other who use your code to skip #include "part.h" by using so called "forward-declaration":

//file foo.h knows struct Part "by name only"
struct Part;
void foo(struct Part* p); //in pure C, works for C++ too
void bar(Part* p); //in C++

In the case of anonymous structure, the file foo.h is forced to #include the file part.h

//file foo.h forced to #include part.h because "part" is typedef of anonymous type
#include "part.h"
void foo(part* p); 

In legacy code quite often these anonymous types lead to a situation when every header includes so many other headers that maintenance and code reuse become a nightmare.

In general I would suggest not to use the anonymous types unless you know precisely what you are doing (there is a number of cases when they are completely OK, e.g. as implementation members of other types).

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