Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to create a Color Picker similar to that of MS Paint.

Unfortunately, I can't figure out the algorithm for saturation.

enter image description here

This is what my current algorithm creates. Anytime I try to perform a saturated effect going down on the Y axis, it just makes everything after the first line completely red or black.

    public ColorWheel()
    {
        for (int y = 0; y < 255; y++)
        {
            for (int x = 0; x < 255 * 6; x++)
            {
                //Red 255 - Green 0-254
                if (color.R == brightness && color.G < brightness && color.B == 0)
                {
                    color.G += 1;

                    //color.R -= (byte)y;
                    //color.G += (byte)y;
                    //color.B += (byte)y;
                }
                //Green 255 - Red 255-0
                else if (color.R > 0 && color.G == brightness && color.B == 0)
                {
                    color.R -= 1;

                    //color.R -= (byte)y;
                    //color.G -= (byte)y;
                    //color.B += (byte)y;
                }
                //Green 255 - Blue 0-255
                else if (color.R == 0 && color.G == brightness && color.B < brightness)
                {
                    color.B += 1;

                    //color.R += (byte)y;
                    //color.G -= (byte)y;
                    //color.B += (byte)y;
                }
                //Blue 255 - Green 255-0
                else if (color.R == 0 && color.G > 0 && color.B == brightness)
                {
                    color.G -= 1;

                    //color.R += (byte)y;
                    //color.G -= (byte)y;
                    //color.B -= (byte)y;
                }
                //Blue 255 - Red 0-255
                else if (color.R < brightness && color.G == 0 && color.B == brightness)
                {
                    color.R += 1;

                    //color.R += (byte)y;
                    //color.G += (byte)y;
                    //color.B -= (byte)y;
                }
                //Red 255 - Blue 255-0
                else if (color.R == brightness && color.G == 0 && color.B > 0)
                {
                    color.B -= 1;

                    //color.R -= (byte)y;
                    //color.G += (byte)y;
                    //color.B -= (byte)y;
                }

                image.SetPixel((uint)x, (uint)y, color);
            }

                //brightness--;
        }
    }
share|improve this question

migrated from graphicdesign.stackexchange.com Dec 16 '13 at 17:07

This question came from our site for Graphic Design professionals, students, and enthusiasts.

1 Answer 1

As you are working in RGB, 255 is 100% saturated on each color, so:

  1. 255, 255, 255 is white or 100% saturated (mixing all colors)
  2. 255, 0, 0 is 100% saturated red with 0% saturation of green and blue. This is as saturated as you can get with pure red.
  3. 50, 0, 0 is a little bit of red, with no green and blue. This will be a dark red, as an absence of color = black.

By keeping the same ratio of red to green to blue, for each color on your spectrum, you could just drive up the % (closer to 255) to make more saturated, and lower the % (closer to 0) to make the same color less saturated (darker).

Hope that helps.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.