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Often I find the need to write functions which return function pointers. Whenever I do, the basic format I use is:

typedef int (*function_type)(int,int);

function_type getFunc()
{
   function_type test;
   test /* = ...*/;
   return test;
}

However this can get cumbersome when dealing with a large number of functions so I would like to not have to declare a typedef for each one (or for each class of functions)

I can remove the typedef and declare the local variable returned in the function as: int (*test)(int a, int b); making the function body look like this:

{
     int (*test)(int a, int b);
     test /* = ...*/;
     return test;
}

but then I do not know what to set for the return type of the function. I have tried:

int(*)(int,int) getFunc()
{
    int (*test)(int a, int b);
    test /* = ...*/;
    return test;
}

but that reports a syntax error. How do I declare the return type for such a function without declaring a typedef for the function pointer. Is it even possible? Also note that I am aware that it seems like it would be cleaner to declare typedefs, for each of the functions, however, I am very careful to structure my code to be as clean and easy to follow as possible. The reason I would like to eliminate the typedefs is that they are often only used to declare the retrieval functions and therefore seem redundant in the code.

share|improve this question
    
+1, interesting, I was wondering that myself a while ago, and just used a typedef . – this Dec 16 '13 at 17:36
1  
Shouldn't test_type be function_type? (Not that it matters that much, but just to be completely clear.) – Kninnug Dec 16 '13 at 17:37
    
You're missing some stuff in your question (e.g. what's the definition of test_type). Makes answering your question much more difficult when we're confused. lol – Fiddling Bits Dec 16 '13 at 17:37
    
yeah that was a typo it should have been function_type – S E Dec 16 '13 at 17:39
1  
@SE Yes. I'm trying to come up with a good example to post as an answer, unless you think that's not the way to go... – Fiddling Bits Dec 16 '13 at 17:49
up vote 20 down vote accepted
int (*getFunc())(int, int) { … }
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You can probably do something like:

int foo (int i) {return i*2;}

int (*return_foo()) (char)
{
   return foo;
}

but god, I hope I'll never have to debug you code....

share|improve this answer
    
as I said in the problem, I wouldnt use it in a scenario where it made the code messy. It is only for those rare occasions when declaring a lot of the typedefs is redundant – S E Dec 16 '13 at 18:29
    
Whoops! Reading that again, it was a bit rude, I'm sorry, I didn't mean it that way - it was meant as a joke. – yosim Dec 16 '13 at 19:57

This is a stupid example, but it's simple and it does not give errors. It's just about declaring static functions:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void * asdf(int);
static int * hjkl(char,float);

main() {
  int a = 0;
  asdf(a);
 }


void * asdf(int a) {return (void *)hjkl; }
static int * hjkl(char a, float b) {int * c; return c;}
share|improve this answer
    
The C standard does not define the behavior of casting pointers-to-data to pointers-to-function. Also, this is not simpler than the OP's example. – Andrey M. Mishchenko Dec 16 '13 at 17:58
    
actually he is not casting a pointer to data to a pointer to a function. He has a pointer to a function, and he is casting to a void* and then casting it back to a function. this is valid, and in fact void* return types is how GNU's dlsym function works, the problem is, that it is basically a form of weak-typing which I try to avoid – S E Sep 29 '14 at 18:29

I think you've got three options:

  1. Stick with typedef. At the end of the day, it's typedef's job.
  2. Return void* and the casting it.
  3. Reconsider your software architecture. Perhaps you could share with us what you're trying to achieve and see if we can point you toward a better direction.
share|improve this answer
    
Note that a void * is not (necessarily) compatible with a function-pointer. – Kninnug Dec 16 '13 at 17:59
3  
A pointer to void is a pointer to an object type, and the C standard does not define the behavior of casting pointers to object types to pointers to function types or vice-versa. You can convert a pointer to a function type to a pointer to another function type, as long as you cast it to a compatible type before using it. – Eric Postpischil Dec 16 '13 at 17:59
    
I'm not trying to achieve anything specifically at the moment its just a problem I have occasionally run into when doing things such as dynamically linking to shared libraries across multiple versions using libld – S E Dec 16 '13 at 18:44

While wrapping some C code in C++ classes, I had the same desire as the original poster: return a function pointer from a function without resorting to typedef'ing the function pointer prototype. I hit a problem with C++ const correctness which I thought was worth sharing, even if it's a little off-topic (C++) but it does relate directly to the original question: the syntax for returning a C function pointer without resorting to a typedef.

The code below defines a class A which stores a function pointer and exposes it to the outside world through the get_f() call. This is the function that should return a function pointer without a typedef.

The point (which stumped me for some time) was how to declare that get_f() was a const function, i.e. it wouldn't alter A.

The code contains 2 variants: the first uses a typedef for the function pointer prototype, whilst the second writes everything out in full. The #if switches between the two.

#include <iostream>

int my_f(int i)
{
  return i + 1;
}

#if 0 // The version using a typedef'ed function pointer

typedef int (*func_t)(int);

class A
{
public:
  A(func_t f) : m_f(f) {}
  func_t get_f() const { return m_f; }

private:
  func_t m_f;
};

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
  const A a(my_f);
  std::cout << "result = " << a.get_f()(2) << std::endl;
}

#else // The version using explicitly prototyped function pointer    

class A
{
public:
  A(int (*f)(int)) : m_f(f) {}
  int (*get_f() const)(int) { return m_f; }

private:
  int (*m_f)(int);
};

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
  const A a(my_f);
  std::cout << "result = " << a.get_f()(2) << std::endl;
}

#endif

The expected/desired output is:

result = 3

The key point is the position of the const qualifier in the line:

int (*get_f() const)(int) { return m_f; }
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