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I'm attempting to implement a simple DICOM STOW-RS message which is a RESTful interface for storing a DICOM (binary) file using HTTP POST (ftp://medical.nema.org/medical/dicom/Final/sup163_ft3.pdf). I'm implementing in Eclipse using Java with Jersey implementation of JAX-RS and Tomcat 7 as the HTTP server.

The problem is that when I extract the InputStream in the Servlet, it seems to contain all the bytes in the source file but the start position (cursor) in the InputStream is about 100 thousand bytes into the 900 thousand byte stream (see attached Watch window).

The client code that creates the HTTP POST message is the following:

  // Store the file to the STOW-RS service
  URL postUrl = new URL(SERVICE + "/studies");

  HttpURLConnection connection = (HttpURLConnection) postUrl.openConnection();
  connection.setDoOutput(true);
  connection.setUseCaches(false);
  connection.setRequestMethod("POST");

  String contentTypeValue =
       "multipart/related;boundary=\"" + boundaryString +
       "\";type=\"application/dicom\"";
  connection.setRequestProperty("Content-Type", contentTypeValue);

  DataOutputStream outputStream =
      new DataOutputStream(connection.getOutputStream());

  // Write the initial boundary and Content-type for the multi-part message
  outputStream.writeBytes("--" + boundaryString + "\r\n");
  outputStream.writeBytes("Content-Type: application/dicom\r\n");
  outputStream.writeBytes("Content-Length: " + theFile.length() + "\r\n");

  // Stream the DICOM file to the message
  int maxBufferSize = 16384;
  byte[] buffer = new byte[maxBufferSize];

  FileInputStream inputStream = new FileInputStream(theFile);
  int bytesAvailable = inputStream.available();
  assert(bytesAvailable > 0);

  // Read file and write it to the message
  while (bytesAvailable > 0)
  {
      int  bytesRead = inputStream.read(buffer, 0,
          Math.min(bytesAvailable,  maxBufferSize));
      assert(bytesRead > 0);

      outputStream.write(buffer, 0, bytesRead);

      bytesAvailable = inputStream.available();
  }
  inputStream.close();

  // Write boundary delimiter to the message stream
  outputStream.writeBytes("\r\n");
  outputStream.writeBytes("--" + boundaryString + "--\r\n");

  // Flush the output stream and read the response
  outputStream.flush();

  int code = connection.getResponseCode();
  System.out.println("Response code = " + code);

  String msg = connection.getResponseMessage();
  System.out.println("Response msg = " + msg);                      

  // Disconnect
  connection.disconnect();

The Servlet code that receives the HTTP POST message is the following:

@POST
@Consumes("multipart/related")
public Response saveMultiPart(MimeMultipart multi)
{
    try
    {
        // Read the parts from the multipart message
        int numberOfParts = multi.getCount();

        for (int partNo = 0; partNo < numberOfParts; partNo++)
        {
            // Process one of the related parts
            BodyPart part = multi.getBodyPart(partNo);
            String type = part.getContentType();
            if (type.equals("application/dicom"))
            {
                InputStream inputStream = part.getInputStream();

                int bytesAvailable = inputStream.available();
                ...

Before going further it can be seen that while the inputStream 'count' value is about the source file size (923,554 bytes) the 'mark', 'pos', and 'start' property values are all set to 110,532 (instead of zero), and instead of bytesAvailable being the full file size it is set to only 813,022 (923,554 - 110,532) . This is confirmed when I let the servlet finish and store the file - the entire first part of the file is missing.

Based on suggestions made in other posts, I tried adding the Content-Length parameter to the request - no change. I also tried using the InputStream.mark() function to rest the pointer to zero - no effect. I verified that InputStream.markSupported() is true. I tried constructing other InputStream types from the returned InputStream, with no effect. I also tried changing the buffer size in the client, thinking that perhaps some part of the file wasn't being flushed - again no effect.

I'd appreciate any suggestions as to what might be going wrong. Thanks.

Update: A colleague suggested that I read the Part content using BodyPart.writeTo() instead of BodyPart.getInputStream(). I am now able to read the entire Part content.

Changed the Servlet code:

FileOutputStream outputStream = new FileOutputStream(theFile);
part.writeTo(outputStream);

The next problem I encountered was that 0x0A bytes in the binary stream were being replaced by 0x0D 0x0A, as the server was interpreting the binary data as Linefeed and replaced it with Carriage Return/Linefeed. This was solved by inserting a blank line immediately after the initial boundary (so that the HTTP header would apply to the part).

Changed the Client code:

String contentTypeValue =
    "multipart/related;boundary=\"" + boundaryString +
    "\";type=\"application/dicom\"";
connection.setRequestProperty("Content-Type", contentTypeValue);

DataOutputStream outputStream =
    new DataOutputStream(connection.getOutputStream());

// Write the initial boundary and Content-type for the multi-part message
outputStream.writeBytes("\r\n");
outputStream.writeBytes("--" + boundaryString + "\r\n");

outputStream.writeBytes("\r\n");
outputStream.writeBytes("Content-Type: application/dicom\r\n");

// Stream the DICOM file to the message
share|improve this question
    
Why are you using a DataOutputStream to wrap the output stream for the request? When reading from the file to upload, why are you checking how much data is available? That method is completely dependent on implementation of InputStream and only states how much can be guaranteed to be read without blocking. It says nothing about how much data is still in the stream. You must read until -1 is returned (from the read call) to ensure you have completely read all the data. – Brett Okken May 24 '14 at 13:30

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