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After I get a handle returned by CreateProcess, I call TerminateProcess, passing 42 for the process exit code. Then, I use WaitForSingleObject for the process to terminate, and finally I call GetExitCodeProcess.

None of the function calls report errors. The child process is an infinite loop and does not terminate on its own.

The problem is that sometimes GetExitCodeProcess returns 42 for the exit code (as it should) and sometimes it returns 0. Any idea why?

#include <string>
#include <sstream>
#include <iostream>
#include <assert.h>
#include <windows.h>

void check_call( bool result, char const * call );
#define CHECK_CALL(call) check_call(call,#call);

int
main( int argc, char const * argv[] )
    {
    if( argc>1 )
        {
        assert( !strcmp(argv[1],"inf") );
        for(;;)
            {
            }
        }
    int err=0;
    for( int i=0; i!=200; ++i )
        {
        STARTUPINFO sinfo;
        ZeroMemory(&sinfo,sizeof(STARTUPINFO));
        sinfo.cb=sizeof(STARTUPINFO);
        PROCESS_INFORMATION pe;
        char cmd_line[32768];
        strcat(strcpy(cmd_line,argv[0])," inf");
        CHECK_CALL((CreateProcess(0,cmd_line,0,0,TRUE,0,0,0,&sinfo,&pe)!=0));
        CHECK_CALL((CloseHandle(pe.hThread)!=0));
        CHECK_CALL((TerminateProcess(pe.hProcess,42)!=0));
        CHECK_CALL((WaitForSingleObject(pe.hProcess,INFINITE)==WAIT_OBJECT_0));
        DWORD ec=0;
        CHECK_CALL((GetExitCodeProcess(pe.hProcess,&ec)!=0));
        CHECK_CALL((CloseHandle(pe.hProcess)!=0));
        err += (ec!=42);
        }
    std::cout << err;
    return 0;
    }

std::string
get_last_error_str( DWORD err )
    {
    std::ostringstream s;
    s << err;
    LPVOID lpMsgBuf=0;
    if( FormatMessageA(
            FORMAT_MESSAGE_ALLOCATE_BUFFER|FORMAT_MESSAGE_FROM_SYSTEM|FORMAT_MESSAGE_IGNORE_INSERTS,
            0,
            err,
            MAKELANGID(LANG_NEUTRAL,SUBLANG_DEFAULT),
            (LPSTR)&lpMsgBuf,
            0,
            0) )
        {
        assert(lpMsgBuf!=0);
        std::string msg;
        try
            {
            std::string((LPCSTR)lpMsgBuf).swap(msg);
            }
        catch(
        ... )
            {
            }
        LocalFree(lpMsgBuf);
        if( !msg.empty() && msg[msg.size()-1]=='\n' )
            msg.resize(msg.size()-1);
        if( !msg.empty() && msg[msg.size()-1]=='\r' )
            msg.resize(msg.size()-1);
        s << ", \"" << msg << '"';
        }
    return s.str();
    }

void
check_call( bool result, char const * call )
    {
    assert(call && *call);
    if( !result )
        {
        std::cerr << call << " failed.\nGetLastError:" << get_last_error_str(GetLastError()) << std::endl;
        exit(2);
        }
    }
share|improve this question
1  
Sounds like you didn't call TerminateProcess() quick enough, it managed to terminate normally without getting whacked early. –  Hans Passant Jan 14 '10 at 2:14
    
Ah I forgot to mention -- the process being terminated is int main() { for(;;) { } } so it can't exit before being wacked. :) –  Emil Jan 14 '10 at 2:33
1  
So the answer is 42, now what was the question? –  Don Neufeld Jan 15 '10 at 7:25
1  
@Don: actually the answer is sometimes 42, but sometimes 0. I guess the universe shuts down for business every now and again. –  Michael Burr Jan 15 '10 at 8:59

3 Answers 3

I thought that nobugz's comment had this nailed...

But here's another wild guess - maybe you're calling TerminateProcess() too soon instead of too late, and Windows doesn't quite serialize setting process error code specified by TerminateProcess() with whatever it might be trying to do at process initialization? I think this is unlikely, but it might be worth putting in the the Sleep(1) call that Seth suggested (or even a Sleep(0)) call to see if the behavior changes.

Also, you might want to consider posting some code that people can experiment with.

share|improve this answer

Please read this and this.

Basically, the TerminateProcess function is an ugly mess that should be avoided. Use it at your own peril.

If at all possible use should use another mechanism to shutdown your process.

share|improve this answer

From GetExitCodeProcess docs:

If the function fails, the return value is zero. To get extended error information, call GetLastError.

From: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms683189(VS.85).aspx

I'd recommend calling GetLastError() to see what broke. You might want to put a sleep(1) in your loop too :P

share|improve this answer
    
I mentioned already that none of the functions report errors. I don't want to Sleep(), and it won't help because, WaitForSingleObject is triggered after the exit code passed to TerminateProcess is stored, as explained in msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms686722%28VS.85%29.aspx. –  Emil Jan 15 '10 at 17:59

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