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Hi have to manage a string of bit.

Which is the best way to do it?!

I know that the use of bool elements can be a good choice, but how can be sure that a bool element uses only one bit of memory?!

I've read about bitset structure, but I've read that it uses the bool element.

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closed as off-topic by Shafik Yaghmour, SingerOfTheFall, Ingo Karkat, Rowland Shaw, Ilya Dec 17 '13 at 8:51

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1  
bool usually is one byte in size. – Marius Dec 16 '13 at 18:21
    
just use an array of <insert primitive type here> and bitmasking. – clcto Dec 16 '13 at 18:21
2  
have you looked at vector<bool>? – soandos Dec 16 '13 at 18:21
    
You can use a bunch of bitfields. But if you need an arbitrary (but defined at compile time) amount of bits, just use a bitset. Otherwise, vector<bool> is often specialized for this purpose. – Cornstalks Dec 16 '13 at 18:22
1  
std::bitset is absolutely fine for this case, especially the i/o interworking. – πάντα ῥεῖ Dec 16 '13 at 18:48
up vote 4 down vote accepted

class template std::bitset and several related functions are used for representing and manipulating fixed-size sequences of bits. Each bit represent either 1 or 0. This class does not use bool type to represent bits. If you need a container that will contain bool values you can consider std::vector<bool>. It is a specialization of template std::vector.

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You have two choices, really:

  • with a reasonable upper-bound of the number of bits, std::bitset<N> where N is the number of bits is very handy
  • otherwise, a std::vector<unsigned char> on top of which you code bit placement is probably best

Note: std::vector<bool> implements this bit-packing for you, so you might use it, however the main issue with it is that at for example will yield a proxy instead of a bool& because of this bit-packing and this can confuse templated code.

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you can use bitset.

You might want to take a look at this. it states :

The class emulates an array of bool elements, but optimized for space allocation: generally, each element occupies only one bit (which, on most systems, is eight times less than the smallest elemental type: char).

Each bit position can be accessed individually: for example, for a given bitset named foo, the expression foo[3] accesses its fourth bit, just like a regular array accesses its elements.

from this link: http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/bitset/bitset/

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vector<bool> MAY store all values as bits, while providing most of the functionality of a regular vector.

http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/vector/vector-bool/

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