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I found the list of syscalls for x86-64 mode (with arguments): http://filippo.io/linux-syscall-table/ but where can I get detailed description of this syscalls?

For example below, which flags can be used for 'open' syscall except 0102o (rw, create), in other cases: read only, write only, etc.

SECTION .data
    message: db 'Hello, world!',0x0a    
    length:    equ    $-message        
    fname    db "result"
    fd       dq 0

SECTION .text
global _start   
_start:
        mov rax, 2            ; 'open' syscall
        mov rdi, fname        ; file name
        mov rsi, 0102o        ; read and write mode, create if not
        mov rdx, 0666o        ; permissions set
        syscall

        mov [fd], rax

        mov    rax, 1          ; 'write' syscall
        mov    rdi, [fd]       ; file descriptor
        mov    rsi, message    ; message address
        mov    rdx, length     ; message string length
        syscall

        mov rax, 3             ; 'close' syscall
        mov rdi, [fd]          ; file descriptor  
        syscall 

        mov    rax, 60        
        mov    rdi, 0        
        syscall

Based on source (may be) https://git.kernel.org/cgit/linux/kernel/git/torvalds/linux.git/tree/fs/open.c how to understand it, which (list of all for open) flags can be used?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The documentation for the syscalls is in section 2 of the man pages and/or in the comments in the source code.

The man page begins with:

   #include <sys/types.h>
   #include <sys/stat.h>
   #include <fcntl.h>

   int open(const char *pathname, int flags);
   int open(const char *pathname, int flags, mode_t mode);

The argument flags must include one of the following access modes: O_RDONLY, O_WRONLY, or O_RDWR. These request opening the file read-only, write-only, or read/write, respectively.

In addition, zero or more file creation flags and file status flags can be bitwise-or'd in flags. The file creation flags are O_CREAT, O_EXCL, O_NOCTTY, and O_TRUNC.

The values for these are trivially looked up in the system header files.

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grep -i 0102 /usr/include/asm/unistd_64.h -nothing. How to take? –  Alex0102o Dec 16 '13 at 20:20
    
@Alex0102o: I don't understand. That file is a list of the syscall entry numbers: nothing to do with a flags argument. The flags are in /usr/include/bits/fcntl.h where 0102 is clearly O_RDWR | O_CREAT (at least in Fedora 17-64). –  wallyk Dec 16 '13 at 20:34
    
wallyk, yes in /usr/include/bits/fcntl.h are this (Debian Lenny 64bit) Thanks you! (Sorry my bad english) 0102 I took from 32bit nasm. –  Alex0102o Dec 16 '13 at 20:39
    
@Alex0102o: You are welcome. Please be sure to "accept" my answer by clicking on the checkmark beside my answer. When you have enough reputation, you can also upvote good answers (and downvote bad ones). –  wallyk Dec 16 '13 at 20:42
    
wallyk, thank you very much. –  Alex0102o Dec 16 '13 at 20:55

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