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I created a JS Fiddle to try different things.

The example asks the question: "How do I make the drop down show only 4 items, each instance of the same string only once?"

My if statement is incorrect, and I'm trying to find the correct way to set the if check.

HTML:

Project:<select id="projectList"></select>

Javascript:

 var projects = [];
 projects.push('<option value="0">- Select a Project -</option>');

 var c = [];
 c.push({project: 'Project 1'});
 c.push({project: 'Project 2'});
 c.push({project: 'Project 3'});
 c.push({project: 'Project 3'});
 c.push({project: 'Project 4'});
 c.push({project: 'Project 3'});

 for (var i = 0, j = c.length; i < j; i++) {
    if ($.inArray(c[i].project, projects) === -1) {
       projects.push('<option value="' + c[i].project + '">' + c[i].project + '</option>');
    }
 }

 $('#projectList').html(projects.join(''));

--- Update

After the first comment, I can ask the question in a different way: "How would I restructure the javascript to populate this dropdown with only 4 distinct values then? Given that I have to use an array that will be sent to me like my variable c?"

share|improve this question
    
@adeneo So how would I restructure the javascript to create a dropdown with only 4 distinct values then? Given that I have to use an array that will be sent to me like my variable c? – codesforcoffee Dec 16 '13 at 20:30
    
Just an observation: There's no need to assign the c.lenght value to j in the condition of your loop. Because you're not using the 'j' variable in the loop for anything else, you could've written your condition like this i < c.length – Vash The Stampede Dec 16 '13 at 20:38
    
@Vash The Stampede I do that for performance so the length doesn't have to be re-evaluated each time. – codesforcoffee Dec 16 '13 at 20:39
    
I don't know... I find it redundant. How much is it going to take the browser to re-evaluate the length? a fraction of a second? Besides, isn't it being re-evaluated when you're assigning j the length of c[]? Anyway, just giving my two cents. ;) – Vash The Stampede Dec 16 '13 at 20:42
    
@Vash The Stampede It does help as data grows larger, and I do need to code for best performance, so I do it this way. :) – codesforcoffee Dec 16 '13 at 20:55
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You're not comparing apples to apples. In your array, you're storing the whole option markup. In your check, you're just checking for the Project n.

I'd use something like:

var projects = ['<option value="0">- Select a Project -</option>'];

var c = [];
c.push({project: 'Project 1'});
c.push({project: 'Project 2'});
c.push({project: 'Project 3'});
c.push({project: 'Project 3'});
c.push({project: 'Project 4'});
c.push({project: 'Project 3'});

var seen = {};

for (var i = 0, j = c.length; i < j; i++) {
   var project = c[i].project;
   if (!seen[project]) {
      projects.push('<option value="' + project + '">' + project + '</option>');
      seen[project] = true;
   }
}

$('#projectList').html(projects.join(''));
share|improve this answer
    
I can't actually change the variable c in my real-life scenario. It is an array of objects being sent to me externally. Each object has a property called "project" that is a string. I just need to create the dropdown so it has each value, but I don't want to repeat strings that are already present in the dropdown list. May I re-ask it that way? :) Thanks so much for the help! – codesforcoffee Dec 16 '13 at 20:35
    
I'm not modifying the functionality of it, it's just a better way to initialize the array. You can ignore that part if you want. – Evan Trimboli Dec 16 '13 at 20:39
    
Ok I'd just need the new variable "seen", I see. Thanks for the help! – codesforcoffee Dec 16 '13 at 20:41

You can create a unique look-up table that checks if the name has already been output. Basically, add:

var names = [];

Then inside your for loop you'd check:

for (var i = 0, j = c.length; i < j; i++) {
  if (names.indexOf(c[i].project) == -1) { // unique project name
    projects.push('<option value="' + c[i].project + '">' + c[i].project + '</option>');
    names.push(c[i].project); // add it to lookup list
  }
}

This is, of course, assuming that the project name is the "key" and the only distinction between displaying it or not.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you :) -Holly – codesforcoffee Dec 16 '13 at 20:56

Here's how I'd do it

$('#projectList').html(function() {
    return $.map(
        $.map(c, function(el) {return el.project;}).filter(function(el, index, arr) {
            return index == arr.indexOf(el);
    }),function(el) {
        return $('<option />', {value : el, text: el});
    });
});

FIDDLE

share|improve this answer
    
I should also add that I want to keep my originally pushed "Select a Project". – codesforcoffee Dec 16 '13 at 20:45
    
@codesforcoffee - the first array value is a string, the others are objects, so it's totally different, and I would probably just solve it like this -> jsfiddle.net/gb543/3 – adeneo Dec 16 '13 at 20:47

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